Lamborghini Diablo 1990 Cars for sale

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Lamborghini : Diablo SV 1998 lamborghini diablo monterey edition sv 3 of 20

$190,000.00

Metairie, Louisiana

Year 1998

Make Lamborghini

Model Diablo

Category Coupe

Mileage 44000

Posted Over 1 Month

1998 Lamborghini Diablo Highly Desirable SV Limited Production Monterey Edition, #3 of only 20 built 44k miles With the Diablos relatively low production run, they're currently making the transition into the collector market. Only 2,967 total produced throughout 1990-2001 Only 425 were SV's ('95-'01) & only 20 were Monterey Editions. All Monterey Editions were painted a different color so all 20 are essentially one of a kind. This Diablo was also the lead car in the 1998 Lamborghini promotion/ceremony "The Running of the Bulls" and was driven by Mario Andretti. Video Link:http://youtu.be/QJACgQfP3a8 Recently received over $20k worth of services performed at Norwood Auto Italia in Carrollton, TX including engine out services, new OEM clutch and gasket replacements.

Trim Diablo

1990 Lamborghini LM002 Extensively Restored New Scorpion Tires 1 of 48 Produced Extremely Rare

$429,950.00

Lynnwood, Washington

Year 1990

Make Lamborghini

Model LM002

Category -

Mileage 11893

Posted Over 1 Month

Photo Viewer 1990 Lamborghini LM002 Extensively Restored New Scorpion Tires 1 of 48 Produced Extremely Rare VIEW OTHER AUCTIONS ASK SELLER QUESTION Vital Information Year Make Model Mileage 1990 Lamborghini LM002 11,893 Exterior Interior Stock # VIN Black Black 12186 ZA9LU45A2LLA12186 Engine 5.2L V12 Carfax Highlights View Carfax Report Not all accidents or other issues are reported to CARFAX. The number of owners is estimated. See the full CARFAX Report for additional information and glossary of terms. Carfax Highlights No Accidents / Damage Reported to CARFAXNo Airbag Deployment Reported to CARFAXVehicle Qualifies for the CARFAX Buyback GuaranteeNo Structural/Frame Damage Reported to CARFAXNo Manufacturer Recalls Reported to CARFAXNo Indication of an Odometer RollbackNo Total Loss Reported to CARFAX View All Photos Description 1990 Lamborghini LM002 Cats Exotics is open to trades of all makes and models! We also offer a wide variety of lease and purchase options. Please call us for more details. 1990 Lamborghini LM 002 America finished in Gloss Black over Black interior. This is one of the RAREST Lamborghini's on Earth - the "Rambo Lambo". 11,893 miles (19,141 Kilometers as seen on odometer). Just out of an extensive 5 year mechanical AND cosmetic restoration totaling OVER $325,000.00. Receipts available upon request. No nut or bolt was left untouched, from the Diablo V12 Motor to the NEW interior. NEW Pirelli Scorpion tires and it's sand lip rear mounted spare. A total of ONLY 301 LM trucks were produced worldwide. From those 301 produced, ONLY 48 are known to have the "Final Edition" upgrades such as this one. RARE rear cargo tool box Rear tonneau cover Alpine stereo head unit with Bluetooth. Lamborghini LM/A floor mats Wheels painted gloss black. The sale includes tools, original keys, books, jack as well as 2 ECU OEM computer units. Copy of the original Window Sticker included showing it's MSRP of $158,000.00! Having arrived in the USA via Florida Port of Entry. Extensive documentation, receipts, service manuals as well as full photo documentation included on this fantastic build. Please note: If you are viewing this vehicle on a site other than CatsExotics.com, please head to our website for documentation & video. Contact Us Dealer Contact Cats Exotics Jonathan Cats425-787-6200Jonathan@CatsExotics.comwww.CatsExotics.com AutoCheck Carfax Secure Online Credit Application Applying for a vehicle loan online is one of the quickest and easiest application methods. Our secure online application form is easy to complete, all you need are a few personal and employment details. Get started now. other vehicles currently available from Cats Exotics Want to know where our customers live? About Us Cats Exotics is a family owned and operated business with our number one focus always being our customers. What started out as a hobby for owner Roy Cats, quickly turned into a successful business venture as he helped many of his friends find the car of their dreams. By the time 2002 rolled around, Roy was almost too busy to partake in the hobby side of things as helping the people he met along the way buy and sell their cars quickly became a full time gig. Cats Exotics specializes not only in Lamborghinis but in all types of cars from Exotics, to Luxury cars, to Muscle cars, to Rare collectibles. Being car people first and business people second, we have been able to cultivate a customer base that we never take for granted and we focus on building long lasting, trusting relationships with all of our clients. As Roy always says, “It’s easier to keep a customer than gain a new one.” Since we are a family business, we try to never lose sight of the important things in life and do our best to enjoy the cars as much as we also make a business out of selling them. Whether it is a trade-in, consignment, brokering service, or simply just a purchase from our inventory we treat every customer the same whether it is a $500 car part or a $500,000 Supercar. With every inquiry and every purchase we invite you to become part of our passion and part of our family. We opened a brand new showroom facility totaling over 20,000 square feet in July 2011 and haven’t looked back since. Feel free to call us anytime at 425-787-6200 or email us at sales@catsexotics.com for any and all inquiries you may have. All vehicles in our inventory are subject to prior sale. We cannot guarantee current availability of every vehicle listed online. Please contact a sales representative at Cats Exotics to confirm availability of a vehicle. Our vehicles are listed on various sites and we do our best to keep all sites updated, but in some cases may take up to 48 hours to reflect our current selection.Payment Methods - Cash in person, certified bank checks, bank to bank wire transfers, or bank financing. Please be sure to have full payment and/or approved financing established prior to placing final bid. Cats Exotics can assist you in securing financing, please call 425-787-6200 for more details.Deposit & Payment of Remaining Balance - A $500.00 NON REFUNDABLE deposit is due within 24 hours of auction close by clicking Buy It Now feature. This payment MUST be submitted via PayPal. The remaining balance due must be paid within 7 business days of the close of the auction, as well as all applicable fees & taxes.Shipping - The buyer is responsible for all shipping charges. Cats Exotics can assist you with shipping your new vehicle, call 425-787-6200 for a customized shipping quote.Buyer's Inspection - We have done our best to make every reasonable effort to describe this vehicle to you. We have disclosed all information known about this vehicle for auction. However, these are used vehicles that may have typical scratches, dings, and possible mechanical parts that are subject to fail. We welcome and recommend a buyer's inspection. Please make arrangements to have inspection done prior to auction ending. Buyer will be responsible for any fees incurred.Warranty - The vehicles herein are pre-owned and they are sold "as is" condition unless otherwise stated in the vehicle description. However, some vehicles may still be under factory warranty or an extended market warranty may be purchased. Ask for details.Notice to Bidders - Remember eBay rules - by placing a bid on this vehicle, you are entering into a legal and binding contract to purchase the above-described vehicle from us.Seller reserves the right to cancel all bids and end the auction at any time for any reason.Communications - Cats Exotics will NOT reply to messages generated through the eBay system. Please contact us direct at 425-787-6200 or 1-800-769-2343 with any questions or concerns you might have.Bid Retractions - Bid retractions are not allowed nor will be recognized within 24 hours of auctions end. Seller will not be obligated to sell in the event of a late retraction. Retracted bids or non-completed sales are subject to a $250.00 fee.Successful Bidder - The winning bidder will be contacted via email after the auction closes and a NON Refundable deposit must be received within 24 hours of auction end. Otherwise, we have the right to pursue other bidders or sell the car outside the auction.Vehicle Location: Not all vehicles offered for sale by Cats Exotics, Inc are located on site. It is bidders responsibility to confirm location of vehicle prior to bidding as the physical location of vehicle may affect shipping costs.All sales subject to $150.00 Document Fee.All vehicles remain for sale until paid for in full. This Vehicle is Being Sold AS-IS, WHERE-IS, with no warranty, expressed, written or implied. The Seller shall not be responsible for the correct description, authenticity, genuineness, or defects herein, nor is responsible for any omissions or errors in advertising and therefore makes no warranty in connection therewith. No allowance or set aside will be made on account of any incorrectness, imperfection, defect or damage. Any descriptions or representations are for identification purposes only and are not to be construed as a warranty of any type. No representations or warranties are made by seller, nor are any representations or warranties relied upon by bidders in making bids. Manufacturer's warranties may still apply. Seller assumes no responsibility for any repairs regardless of any oral statements about the vehicle, post sale. Please also note unless otherwise stated assume all vehicles come with only one key and no manuals. Please ask your sales representative to verify for extra keys or manuals. Out of state buyers are responsible for all state, county, city taxes and fees, as well as title/registration fees in the state that the vehicle will be registered. Vehicle listings and information are subject to change without notice. Vehicles are also subject to prior sale without notice. While every reasonable effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, we are not responsible for any errors or omissions contained on these pages. Please verify any information in question with Cats Exotics. Rates and terms are subject to change and loans are subject to individual credit approval. Not all applicants will qualify. All taxes and state fees will be an additional cost. OAC means On Approved Credit. The payment provided by this calculation is for illustrative purposes only and should not be considered an offer to extend credit or an offer of sale. Credit application and approval required. Actual payment and interest rate may vary with each individual situation. Be sure to consult a financial professional prior to relying on the information outlined above. These calculations are intended for illustrative purposes only and accuracy is not guaranteed. Dealer Web Site is licensed and operated by our Dealership which is an automotive dealership operation or related dealership marketing entity consisting of the dealership(s), make(s), vehicle inventory and/or marketing content represented in this Site and its subsidiary Sites. The information within this Site is provided "as is". No warranty is expressed or implied to the fullest extent permissible by applicable law. Our Dealership and any of its providers of information do not warrant error-free or uninterrupted service of this Site. Please note that this Site is operated in the city where our Dealership is located and therefore all Disclaimers are predicated on applicable state laws in which our Dealership is located or country laws and standards. Visitors from outside the state our Dealership is located or country should be aware that our Dealership makes no representation that this Site and the information contained herein is appropriate or available for use in other areas. Those who enter this Site from outside the state our Dealership is located or country do so at their own initiative and are directly responsible for compliance with their local laws to the extent those laws apply. All vehicles are sold on an "as-is, where-is" basis unless stated otherwise. All prices plus sales tax and shop supplies where applicable. Picture may not represent actual vehicle. Prices and special offers are subject to change. Mileage listings are estimates and are not necessarily accurate odometer readings. Some vehicle information and vehicle pricing may be unintentionally missing or inaccurate, and our Dealership will endeavor to correct such discrepancies in a commercially reasonable manner upon Customer notification of such errors or omissions, but pricing errors and listing errors are considered invalid and may or may not be honored at the sole discretion of our Dealership and its participating dealerships.Thank you for your understanding and good luck bidding! Ad created by DealerSocket Inventory+. Call 877-487-5822 to find out how Inventory+ can service your dealership. eCarList.com

Lamborghini : Countach 25th Anniversary Edition Concours 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary Edition - Low Mileage

$450,000.00

Scotts Valley, California

Year 1989

Make Lamborghini

Model Countach

Category -

Mileage 9429

Posted Over 1 Month

831-430-9940 EBizAutos 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary Edition Collector Car 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary Edition PHOTOS PHOTOS Photo 1 of 60 Request More Info VIN: ZA9CA05A4KLA12514 Stock #: 4939 Condition: Used Clear Title Mileage: 9,429 Transmission: 5 Spd Manual Engine: 5.2 LITER V12 Drivetrain: Rear Wheel Drive Exterior Color: Black Interior Color: Light Tan PHOTO VIEWER PHOTO VIEWER VIEW OTHER AUCTIONS VIEW OTHER AUCTIONS EMAIL A FRIEND EMAIL A FRIEND MORE PHOTOS & DETAILS MORE PHOTOS & DETAILS Vehicle Overview 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary Edition VIN: ZA9CA05A4KLA12514 9,429 original miles (15,173 km) Fully serviced One of 658 Anniversary cars produced Mileage confirmed by CarFax and NMVTIS An icon of automotive design, the Lamborghini Countach rewrote the rules by which all supercars where measured. This 9,429-mile 25th Anniversary edition expresses Horatio Pagani's interpretation of the striking Marcello Gandini design. A very well kept collector car, in 2007, at 14,463 km, the Countach had its complete fuel system refurbished from the gas tank to the fuel injectors, as well as the brake calipers rebuilt and brake system restored, and a new alternator and climate control module installed representing over $10,000 worth of work. Since arriving at Canepa the Countach has been completely cosmetically detailed and mechanically serviced. The engine was tuned, and every mechanical system in the car was evaluated and repaired if necessary. Over 200 hours was spent on the exterior and interior detailing alone. No expense was spared on this low mileage, original car, and the Countach has received anything required to bring it to 100% condition. As it sits now the Countach is impeccable both mechanically and cosmetically. And for those who miss the rear wing, have no fear ... the car comes with its original rear wing in excellent condition, and ready to be reinstalled if wished. About the 25th Anniversary Countach 5167 cc V12 Horsepower: 449 Torque: 369 ft/lb 0-62 mph: 4.9 seconds Top Speed: 183 mph Named to honor the company's twenty-fifth anniversary, the 25th Anniversary Countach was mechanically very similar to the 5000QV but sported much changed styling courtesy of Horatio Pagani. The rear air boxes were restyled and enlarged, while the vents behind them were changed so that they ran front to back instead of side to side. In addition, a new air dam and side skirting, both with air intakes, were fitted, and the taillights were restyled to be narrower, with body-colored panels replacing the upper and lower parts of the previous large taillights. The styling changes were striking on the 25 year old design, and had the added benefit of improved the engine's cooling, a problem the powerful Countach had always struggled with. The Countach also featured 345/35R15 tires; the widest tires ever available on a production car at the time. The Anniversary was produced from 1988 to 1990 when it was finally replaced by the Lamborghini Diablo. VIN Decode: Z-Europe A-Italy 9-Small Manufacturer C-Countach A-USA 0-Coupe 5-5.2L V12 VVT A-Features: Active Restraints 4-North American VIN Check Digit K-1989 L-Plant (Sant'Agata Bolognese - Bologna Italia) A12-Automobili Lamborghini 514 - Serial Number Contact Automobile Sales on 408 656 1491 to discuss this exceptional motorcar. Additional Photos About Canepa Canepa, headquartered in Scotts Valley, CA, provides exceptional automobiles to collectors worldwide, as well as performing Pebble Beach level restorations on historically important vehicles. Canepa Motorsport is the racing arm of Canepa, and is a recognized leader in mechanical and cosmetic vintage racecar restoration, preparation, and track support. Attending 6 to 8 premiere vintage races each season, our focus is on 1970's to 1980's era race cars: Can-Am, Trans-Am, IMSA, FIA, Group C, Historic NASCAR, and Historic Formula One. Buyer Resources Contact Automobile Sales for more information Phone: 831-430-9940 Mobile: 408-656-1491 Request More Info Shipping Information Although we encourage an in-person pre-sale inspection and delivery, Canepa will assist with shipping worldwide. We are able to provide insured domestic road transportation, and ocean, or air freight quotes for international shipping. Please contact us at 831-430-9940 to discuss shipping this vehicle to your location. Terms of Sale Overview We reserve the right to end this listing at anytime should the vehicle no longer be available for sale. The following terms of sale apply to all of our listings. Please contact Canepa Design at 831.430.9940 for further information. Canepa Scotts Valley CA Contact Automobile Sales Phone: 831-430-9940 Mobile: 408-656-1491 Contact Automobile Sales for more information Phone: 831-430-9940 Mobile: 408-656-1491 Request More Info It is the customer's sole responsibility to verify the existence and condition of any equipment listed. Neither the dealership nor eBizAutos is responsible for misprints on prices or equipment. It is the customer's sole responsibility to verify the accuracy of the prices with the dealer, including the pricing for all added accessories. Copyright © 2001-2015 eBizAutos. All Rights Reserved. eBay Motors Software by eBizAutos Counter Provided by eBizAutos.com

1989 Mercedes-Benz SL-Class AMG 1989 Mercedes 560SL AMG Original Owner 24,000 miles AMG North America

$84,500.00

Miami, Florida

Year 1989

Make Mercedes-Benz

Model SL-Class

Category Convertible

Mileage 24000

Posted Over 1 Month

Curated photo viewer 1989 Mercedes 560sl built by amg new vital information 1989 MERCEDES 560SL AMG 24,000 Original Miles Red over Black Ordered New and Built by AMG North America Only a handful in the USA Investment Quality DESCRIPTION 1989 Mercedes 560SL AMG 24,000 Original, One Owner MilesFully Documented and Built by AMG North AmericaBooks, Tools and Records Last month an original Mercedes 190E Evolution II sold for an outstanding $220,000 at auction, followed by a Mercedes Mclaren SLR for $675,000 and in December we sold our Mercedes CLK DTM Coupe in a record 60 days after having an incredible amount of interest from collectors across the US. The month prior we sold our 2008 Mercedes CLK63 Black Series in 1 week and our 2012 Mercedes SLS AMG Black Series in 1 day.Lets face it, with the introduction of the new Mercedes-AMG Hypercar Project One and Mercedes AMG GTR all things related to Mercedes AMG are HOT. When we recently got called on a 1989 Mercedes 560 SL AMG, built by AMG North America, we had to pursue the lead. 1980s were undeniably special. Radio waves were ruled by pop artists Madonna, Milli Vanilli and Bobby Brown and NBC aired the television series Miami Vice for 5 seasons, until May of 1989. Meanwhile, German tuning company, AMG, rocked the automotive world with its luxury 200mph Mercedes rockets. Ordered new from Mercedes Ontario, its first and only owner sent our 1989 Mercedes 560SL car directly from the dealer to Missouri, home of AMG North America. Supplied with a specific AMG SL ordering sheet, the original owner spent over $8,000.00 on AMG options and accessories. Including, AMG wheels, side skirts, European headlamps, a telephone and even an AMG spec limited slip differential. What’s remarkable about this car is not only is it arguably the nicest 560 SL we have ever seen, its that the original owner kept every envelope, document and brochure from AMG. In addition to being so well documented and babied since 1989 with only 24,000 miles, how many SL’s were modified by AMG? Our guess? A handful. How many left? Not many. While not the most absurd thing to come out of the 1980s, our 1989 Mercedes 560 SL AMG is a piece of automotive history un-paralleled. One owner, 24,000 miles and documented from AMG. CONTACT US Dealer Contact © CURATED BISCAYNE BLVD, MIAMI FL Tel: 1-561-801-0092 BELOW ARE A FEW OF THE OTHER VEHICLES CURRENTLY AVAILABLE FROM CURATED about us Curated Almost 60 years ago my grandfather started repairing odd and rare European cars in Springfield, Mass. During an era where Ferrari and Lamborghini were building small quantities of hand made cars that rarely made it onto American soil. Arguably, this moment in history was the most significant time for the automobile, an era that produced the most iconic cars of our time which became the DNA for todays most famous marques. He bought and sold cars like the Ferrari 250 GTO, Jaguar D-Type and Lamborghini Miura. (Selling his Ferrari 250 GTO for $9,500.00 to Robert Sowers has always been a sore spot.) While my grandfather loved engineering and mechanics, my father loved the automobile. Working under the stewardship of my grandfather, he became a brilliant mechanic and at an early age started collecting cars. At the New York Auto Show in 1972 he bought a one-off Lamborghini Miura SV from Modena Racing that he still posses today. In the 1980s, my father became the authorized service in Palm Beach, Florida for Lamborghini facilitated by Joe Nastasi. Nastasi was the sole distributor for Lamborghini in the Americas. I grew up around and inside LM002's, Countach's and Jalpa's. For my father and myself the automobile was not a livelihood, it was an obsession. He amassed a collection of toys, parts and cars that is unparallaled in the world. While other kids spent their afternoons and summers in camp, I spent it on the shop floor, cleaning Ferrari F50's, reading 25th Anniversary owners manuals and studying serial numbers, factory/dealer options and sweeping floors. After the world's best education, an MBA in everything Ferrari and Lamborghini, In 2005 I left home and began my own journey. This journey is dedicated to Jacques Temerian and John Temerian Sr. The Goal. The goal of Curated is quite simple. After 12 years of buying and selling hundreds of vintage Lamborghini's and Ferrari's, I have partnered with Jordi Ricart and Alan Lazowski to prove that the automobile is a viable and consistent alternative investment asset class. Ignoring the noise of speculating dealers, ???Broadway?? Show auction houses and using reason and passion to build an investment automobile collection portfolio. We are in the constant pursuit of pairing the worlds greatest automobiles with the worlds greatest collections. We buy, trade and sell ONLY very specific cars. Why We invest? The key to this asset is like any other... Knowledge of the investment, knowledge of the market, accessibility to product, and liquidity of product. Curated knows Classic Cars. We are strict about what we buy and dedicated to our DNA. We only buy, trade and sell cars we know; Lamborghini Countach, Diablo and Miura models. Specific Ferrari Challenge models. Specific Supercar models from 1980s/1990s. And a few Jaguar E-Types here and there...

Trim AMG

Alfa Romeo : Montreal The best Montreal on the Planet, Must see the pictures and video, THE BEST!!!!

$167,000.00

Scottsdale, Arizona

Year 1971

Make Alfa Romeo

Model Montreal

Category -

Mileage 6334

Posted Over 1 Month

Phone: 480-318-2277 Address: 14825 N 82nd St, Scottsdale, AZ 85260 EBizAutos 1971 Alfa Romeo Montreal Coupe PHOTOS PHOTOS Photo 1 of 90 Request More Info VIN: AR1425803 Stock #: AR1425803 Condition: Used Clear Title Mileage: 6,334 Transmission: 5 Spd Manual Engine: V8 Drivetrain: Rear Wheel Drive Exterior Color: Red Interior Color: Black PHOTO VIEWER PHOTO VIEWER VIEW OTHER AUCTIONS VIEW OTHER AUCTIONS EMAIL A FRIEND EMAIL A FRIEND MORE PHOTOS & DETAILS MORE PHOTOS & DETAILS Additional Photos Vehicle Overview View on YouTube THE WORLDS FINEST 1971 ALFA ROMEO MONTREAL! This is the most exquisite Alfa Romeo Montreal on the planet. Designed by Marcello Gandini, the man responsible for many of the world's finest and most expensive automobiles such as the Lamborghini Muira, Lamborghini Countach, Lamborghini Diablo, Bugatti EB110, De Tomaso Pantera, Ferrari Dino and many more. The owner broke a world record bidding against others for the rare opportunity to own this coveted Montreal. This particular car has set the bar for the rest. Now is your chance to own not only a rare piece of automotive history but also the finest example known to exist. Do not take our word for it, check out this link (http://www.goodingco.com/vehicle/1971-alfa-romeo-montreal/). ***Here are some of the vehicles highlights*** Sold new in Italy, the Montreal in question, chassis number AR1425803, came to the United States in 1985 and changed hands a few times over the next decade before Bill Greenslade of the Arizona Alfa Romeo Owners Club bought it. In the decade and a half that Greenslade owned it, he repainted it - in the process swapping its original Alfa Romeo red for a Ferrari red - and treated it to an extensive mechanical refurbishment that included a new water pump bearing for the 200hp 2,593-cc dual overhead-camshaft V-8 as well as a rebuilt Spica mechanical fuel-injection system and an upgraded steering box. According to Gooding's description of the Montreal, the car took AROC first-place awards multiple times in the 1990s and 2000s, took a second in class at the 2013 Santa Fe Concorso, and has participated in multiple rallies, including the Copperstate 1000. It even earned a feature article in the January/February 2002 issue (#187) of Special Interest Autos. A majority our business is with clients that are out of state and satisfaction is essential. The condition of each of our vehicles is guaranteed and put in writing. Buy with confidence knowing you're getting a vehicle we are going to stand behind! All of our cars are kept indoors and shown by appointment only. To view a complete list of inventory please visit our website. Please contact Mark Hubbard @ 480-318-2277 for more information. Buyer Resources Contact Mark Hubbard for more information Phone: 480-318-2277 Request More Info Vehicle Condition Service History 6,334 Miles No Known Mechanical Problems Warranty As-Is - Extended Warranty Available. Contact seller for details. Condition Report Excellent Interior Excellent Carpets Excellent Seats Excellent Dashboard Excellent Panels / Headliner Excellent Exterior Excellent Original Paint Excellent Trim Condition Excellent Glass Condition No Visible Rust No Known Accidents No Known Bodywork Fully Detailed Features & Options Ext / Int Color Redwith Black Cloth Interior Audio / Video AM/FM Financing Information Contact us today at 480-318-2277 for more information, or fill out our Online Credit Application to begin the pre-approval process today. Warranty Information If you are interested in one of our vehicles and have a question on available warranties, please contact us! Shipping Information National Vehicle Shipping We understand your need for reliable auto shipping sources accompanied by great customer service. We offer door to door nationwide service, as well as international shipping, at a very competitive price. Plus, we pride ourselves on offering the best customer service in the industry, to make your move the easiest process possible. Contact us today or email us for your free quote and to discover how we are working with you. Terms of Sale Overview We reserve the right to end this listing at anytime should the vehicle no longer be available for sale. The following terms of sale apply to all of our listings. Payment Terms: The successful high bidder will submit a $1,000 non-refundable deposit within 2 business days of the close of the auction to secure the vehicle. Buyer agrees to pay remaining balance due (plus applicable fees and taxes) within 5 days of the close of the auction. All financial transactions must be completed before delivery of the vehicle. Payment Methods: Cash (In Person), certified check, bank transfer, or 3rd-party financing. Fees and Taxes: Out of state buyers are responsible for all state, county, city taxes and fees, as well as title/registration fees in the state that the vehicle will be registered. Quick Links Warranty Info Financing Info Shipping Info Terms of Sale Get A FreeCARFAX Record Check Check Blue Book Value Hubbard Auto Center Scottsdale AZ Contact Mark Hubbard Phone: 480-318-2277 Contact Mark Hubbard for more information Phone: 480-318-2277 Request More Info It is the customer's sole responsibility to verify the existence and condition of any equipment listed. Neither the dealership nor eBizAutos is responsible for misprints on prices or equipment. It is the customer's sole responsibility to verify the accuracy of the prices with the dealer, including the pricing for all added accessories. Copyright © 2001-2015 eBizAutos. All Rights Reserved. eBay Motors Software by eBizAutos Counter Provided by eBizAutos.com

1996 Ferrari 355 Ferrari F355 SPIDER UNIQUE CLASSIC COLOR 355 SERVICED HRE MANUAL GEARBOX TUBI

$84,900.00

Beverly Hills, California

Year 1996

Make Ferrari

Model 355

Category -

Mileage 17800

Posted Over 1 Month

THIS FERRARI CURRENTLY HAS A CLEAR AND UNBRANDED TITLE. (Ebay needs to clarify its “Vehicle Title” designation.) Detailed history for this Ferrari outlined below. This is perhaps the rarest and most striking of all F355 Ferrari Spiders. While there are literally thousands of red, yellow and black 355s this is the only classic Le Mans blue over Bordeaux 355 Spider known to exist. This is a classic color combination that was popular on classic Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati from the golden era of motoring and remains so, such so that when Ferrari unveiled its hyper rare F60, of which only 10 of the $2.5 million dollar cars were ever built, it was a blue car with a red interior…much like the 1950s California Spider with the same color combination. Presently on display at the Petersen Museum is the latest Bugatti (nearly $3 million) and it is painted in a nearly identical color combination. When Ferrari/Maserati designer Jason Castriota, who designed the 599, Maserati Birdcage 75th and the Maserati GranTurismo, decided to build a million dollar one-off 599 for his father he too chose blue over red for his personal creation. This Ferrari features the very expensive ($10,000 I’m told) option of the upper dash and steering wheel in red leather along with dark navy blue carpets that contrast beautifully yet subtlety with the red interior and complement the matching blue exterior. The $7,000 HRE wheels really compliment this Ferrari’s color combination while giving much better grip and braking thanks to the larger front and rear high performance tires. Factory muffler presently installed but I also have a Tubi Exhaust that I may install this week. Four new Michelin Pilot Sport tires (~$1,500). The typical shrinking leather dash on the F355 was just addressed with thousands spent on new leather. Similarly, the red leather cover for the top is also new ($1500). The red leather interior, including the very expensive OPTION of a full red leather dash and matching steering wheel (said to be a $10,000 option), is in excellent condition as are the beautifully contrasting navy carpets with matching Ferrari original navy floor mats. A full engine out service was performed less than 1000 miles ago. New hood and trunk struts were installed. There are no sticky parts. Gorgeous $1,000 carbon fiber door sill trim panels have been fitted. (The blue you see on the left side of the engine panel is merely a reflection from the bar: The panel is actually black and matches the panel on the right side.) This Ferrari 355 is in exceptional show condition. The 355 is appreciating and on its way to collector car status. ROAD & TRACK listed it as one of the 10 best looking mid-engined Ferraris of all time, saying it sounds “incredible” and that its “styling has aged well, perhaps looking better than when it was first introduced.” The great Phil Hill described it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever built. Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson said it was “the nicest car I have ever ever driven.” He then said he came back from that drive and decided “I have to have one, I have to have one. I have to.” He then went out and bought one for himself. After buying it he said “it’s still the best car I’ve ever driven.” Richard Hammond recently described the 355 in glowing terms as well in an article (below), echoing Road and Track’s sentiment, stating: “If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived.” A recent 5,600 mile reviewer of the 355 for AutoLog noted: “I’m paraphrasing, but Autoblog reader Paul Dyer asked me one day, ‘Want to drive my 1998 Ferrari F355 Spider from San Jose, California, to me in Newfoundland?’ I'm also paraphrasing and leaving out some colorful but unpublishable language, but essentially I said, "Yes." That's how I ended up on a two-week, 5,600-mile road trip, getting an extensive and intimate look at one of the most spectacular cars of our generation. Here's what I discovered. To paraphrase, you don't even know how badly you want an F355. The F355 Spider is the last beautiful Ferrari. Subsequent stallions are modern and dramatic, the F355 is eternally gorgeous, like Brunelleschi's doors and sunsets in Viareggio. The Iliad would still make sense if you said the Greeks took to ship after a Trojan keyed Menelaus' F355. You cannot say the same about the 348, or even the 458 (though we do love it so). “Road & Track said the F355 had "probably the best sports-car engine ever made." Jeremy Clarkson said it was the best car he'd ever driven. That owner who said he wouldn't recommend it? He's had two, and still uses one as his daily driver.” On Pistonheads it was also said the 355 was the last “truly beautiful” Ferrari. In fact, it’s a common notion that the 355 was the last truly classically pretty Ferrari. The 355 is the last Ferrari built with a throttle cable between the gas pedal and the throttle bodies on the engine and a rod operated manual gearbox. It is the last “small” Ferrari. It is the last traditionally built Ferrari. It is the Ferrari that saved Ferrari and turned its reputation around in the mid-1990s. It is well on its way to being a collector’s Ferrari. See the article below comparing the F355 to the Dino. The 355 is a great investment. It's the end of the Enzo era inspired cars, the last of the hand-built cars and they made very few with just 2,664 six speed manual transmission spiders being made for the world. Compare that to the 360 where Ferrari made more than 13,000 of that model approximately half of which are spiders! This is the end of the small, svelte go-kart like handling Ferraris. It sounds more like an F1 car than any other road Ferrari. It has 5 valve per cylinder and titanium connecting rods. It is the last of the Ferrari with a manual transmission and a true throttle cable as opposed to indirect drive by wire found in the 360 and later cars. It is the best shifting, best driving true sports car from Ferrari bridging the analog cars to digital cars threshold. The 458 spider is an amazing car but it was mass produced, still costs around $250k and only comes with an automatic transmission and drive by wire, doesn't sound as good as the F355, and as a spider doesn't look as good as the F355 with its two giant humps behind the seats. It’s also huge compared to a 355 and takes no driver skill and has far less driver involvement. If you are wanting a true classic Ferrari experience with modern performance capabilities the F355 is the only car that fits the bill. Fast, fun, lightweight, sounds great, great to look at, and by today’s Ferrari standards produced in limited numbers. More fun and nimble than a 550, the other last analog Ferrari. The F355 will only appreciate as a classic in the future. HISTORY This Ferrari currently has a clear title. I have the full history of the car and I have spoken to the prior owner of the vehicle responsible for bringing the car to California. Please read the full history. Here is the history for this Ferrari: The prior California owner, then an Executive with Warner Brothers, purchased the car from Huntingridge Motors in 2005. One evening he was celebrating the conclusion of a work project at a Hotel on the corner of La Cienega Blvd and Beverly Blvd here in Los Angeles. He let the manager from computer animation company they were working with drive his Ferrari as she stated she had never driven a Ferrari before. They sat at a light at that intersection adjacent to the hotel. I have spoken to both the owner and the driver and both state what happened next. Their left turn arrow turned green. She started her left turn and was driving slowly. The owner told her to give it some gas. She gave it only a slight amount of gas. He then instructed her to give it some more gas. By now they were midway through the turn. She gave it a lot more gas just as the car came into its powerband and the car spun as it was already mid-turn. The car was not going very fast as she was just turning left at the intersection where the hotel is located. With the Ferrari fishtailing, the Ferrari’s rear wheel hit the sidewalk. They both got out of the car and were actually relieved to see there was no body damage. Even the wheel itself looked okay but clearly the A-arm had bent as a result of hitting the curb. I have obtained the insurance company photographs which confirm this as well. Not one body panel on the car was damaged, no airbags deployed nor was there any serious damage. All the damage was of the simple bolt-off, bolt-on repair variety that could have been done by a weekend hobbyist. At that time the owner of the Ferrari desired a BMW Z8. So the Ferrari was taken to Ferrari of Beverly Hills, the most expensive place probably in the nation to service and repair a Ferrari. Just as expected, they wrote an over the top Beverly Hills Ferrari repair estimate as each brand new part from their retail price sheet was expensive (and typically more expensive than even other Ferrari dealers). For example, Beverly Hills Ferrari wanted nearly $15,000 to replace the rear suspension corner, which consists of jut four nuts to mount the top and four nuts and bolts to mount the A arms and a complete assembly was then on sale on Ebay for $1,500. Thus, Ferrari of Beverly Hills did what was expected, they wrote a high estimate. Also as expected, Mercury Insurance concluded it would be more cost effective to pay off the car and then sell the car at an auction. As the car still looked very good without any damaged body panels, a new looking interior and super low miles, Mercury calculated it would generate a good auction sale value. What most people don’t realize is that with expensive cars like Ferraris insurance companies are quick to right them off not because the cars are ‘totaled’ but because it makes economic sense for them to do so. By paying the car off and then selling it at an auction Mercury could avoid having to pay other non-repair costs, such as rental car and loss of use of the Ferrari. The owner of the Ferrari would have been entitled to a rental car that was comparable to his Ferrari and here in LA they rent these cars out at more than $1,000 per day. Not only would it take time for BH Ferrari to repair the car but they might have to wait for parts to arrive from Italy, further driving up the rental car costs. Whether a loss of use claim or a rental car cost, renting a Ferrari is typically over $1,000 a day and if the car took four to six weeks to repair which was entirely possible (e.g., waiting for parts from Italy) that cost alone could be in excess of $30,000. As the owner had his eye on a Z8 he was happy to have Mercury “total” his Ferrari. With such a low mileage Ferrari with visibly little damage at all, Mercury believed they could get $45,000 to $50,000 for the Ferrari at an auction and save $30k in rental and loss of use fees and with the owner having “only” paid approximately $70k for the Ferrari, Mercury made a business decision to cut a check and sell the car at an auction. Mercury turned this paper into California’s DMV who then proceeded to issue a branded California title. A gentleman purchased the Ferrari and had it repaired. The Ferrari was registered in Illinois where a clear (non-branded) title was issued. This Ferrari was never issued a branded title because of extensive damage. On the contrary, it was branded simply because Mercury concluded it would be more cost efficient to sell the car at an auction. I have this information straight from Mercury Insurance records, including numerous photos from Mercury Insurance, and from speaking directly with the owner and the driver of the Ferrari. I contacted the State of California about correcting their records and they said they would not. Legal action was then taken against the State of California to correct their records to accurately reflect the truth of what happened and for them to cease falsely representing the car’s history. However, the State of California argued even if their information was false they were nevertheless protected by government immunity statutes and the Judge agreed. The case was dismissed but not before I was able to obtain the car's records. These records show the car was never totaled, was never a salvage vehicle or rebuilt. They all show the mileage is completely accurate. There are many cars on Ebay, including Ferraris, Porsche and Lamborghinis that have had far greater mishaps but have these issues unreported. With this car you know exactly what you are getting thanks to the documented history including photographs. Owners Manual and tool kit included. From CLASSIC DRIVER: Has the Ferrari F355 already become a classic? 22 August 2014 Inheriting the proportions of its predecessor, the Ferrari F355 was outwardly a much better-resolved proposition, both aesthetically and aerodynamically. But beneath the smoother skin were further major advancements, including power steering, variable damping, and a 100cc engine enlargement to 3.5 litres. In revised form, the now-375bhp V8 revved out to 8,500rpm and, even more impressively, conjured more bhp per litre than the V12 in the McLaren F1. “It was also the first truly reliable Ferrari,” adds Hartley Junior. “Unlike the Testarossa and 348, you could invariably put one in for a routine service without being hit with an astronomical bill.”As one era was beginning, another was coming to an end: it was to be the last of the breed to be hand-built, with the 360 and later descendants moving to mass production. “Perhaps this is why it’s similar to the F40 and F50 in the way it follows the trends of the classic car market,” ponders Hartley Junior. “In recent years, values of the 355 have climbed 25-30% – influenced somewhat by the 328 GTS – and I think this will continue to be the case. I can see this particular example being a quarter-of-a-million-pound car within the next 10 years.” “The 355 was a sweet spot in the transition from ‘analogue’ to ‘digital’, blending timeless looks and an honest character with just enough modern influence to make it a tempting proposition today." TOP GEAR AND RICHARD HAMMOND ON THE F355 All the legend, the myth, the history and mystery in the world cannot distract from one single fact when it comes to Ferraris: they have to be pretty. Stat sheets can go on about power-to-weight ratios, structural stiffness, torsional rigidity and exotic materials all day long, but if the car looks like a moose, then it’s a moose - an offence made all the worse if it’s supposed to be a prancing horse. The 348 that preceded the 355 was not an especially ugly car, but it also wasn’t especially pretty. The slats down the side echoed the Testarossa - not a good thing - so it looked dated even when it was brand new. And it certainly wasn’t a hit, performance-wise. In fact, much was made of the news that Honda launched the NSX at the same time, and it appeared to be, in every single way, better than the Ferrari. The 355 was Ferrari’s answer. Beauty and power came together and are still very much in evidence today. I’m not one for getting all gooey about Ferraris in general, but there is undeniably something that happens deep inside when you see that yellow badge on a V8 or a steering-wheel boss. Ferrari: the name carries so much weight, even to those who, like me, have never had - nor wanted - a hat with the brand on it. And, my God, the 355 is pretty. It shared almost every dimension with the 348, but the body was all-new and its sculpting had involved a rumoured 1,800 hours of wind-tunnel testing. But there’s little sense of form following function here; it’s too pretty for that. If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived. Inside, I get a reminder that all Ferraris go through a phase when they are not classic - they’re just old Fezzers. I’d say that the 355 is coming through that and entering the classic stage of its life. In true Ferrari form, the interior has dated well. The layout, the design and the feel of it all scream of their own time and, while not fooling anyone that they were drawn yesterday, still have something to say about their period in car design… almost the definition of a classic, in fact. The mid-mounted 380bhp V8 revs to 8,250rpm and sounds satisfyingly guttural and raucous when it does so. It’s a Ferrari, so while it has to be pretty, it can’t afford to be slow either. And it’s quick, it really is. The headlines, 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183mph, are both perfectly acceptable, thank you. The way it delivers those is what it’s all about. The bark and fizz of the V8, the click-clack through that iconic, shiny H-gate - it’s all there. It’s a Ferrari and feels it. The engine and suspension all received major updates to produce the 355, and the gearbox too, with a six-speed manual operated, of course, through that sculptural gear selector. It feels all those things a Ferrari needs to feel; it’s a taut thoroughbred, and you get the sense too that, once you’ve overcome the inevitable nerves that can flutter at any encounter with any Ferrari, the thing is biddable and usable, with perhaps just a touch of fragility to keep things special. There’s a huge amount of love for the F355, with some claiming it pretty much saved the company from the doldrums in the early Nineties, others that it was the car that finally shifted the old-fashioned and faintly stuffy conviction amongst the Ferraristi that the only ‘proper’ Ferraris were the V12s. Some, including F1 champion Phil Hill, named it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever. A landmark car, then, in the story of a legendary carmaker. COMPARING THE 355 TO THE 246 DINO The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears It used to be that a gentleman driver would only consider a Ferrari with a large and powerful V12 engine mounted up front. Porsche manufactured small, rear-engined sporting cars for the arriviste. ?All that changed when Ferrari launched the Dino, with a mid-mounted V6, and followed it with a succession ?of V8-engined sports cars. Ever since, Ferrari has offered two tiers of performance and style – but the Dino has moved out of the new-money realm into ?the collector-car stratosphere. Could the 1990s F355 be about to follow suit? Ferrari broke from its traditional front-engine philosophy in 1968, when the diminutive Dino appeared. The new model was not even badged a Ferrari; it was simply a Dino 206GT. To make matters worse it was developed along with Fiat, the V6 finding its way under the bonnet of the Fiat Dino Coupé and Spider. Motoring aristocrats such as the Agnellis of this world were about to be joined by successful Luigis who owned lucrative pasta joints. What was Enzo thinking? To be fair, the Old Man wasn’t keen on the mid-engine configuration for road cars – although his 250LM racer had proved to be the future for sports racing cars – as he thought the layout unsafe in the hands of customers. In the 1950s, his son Alfredo Dino Ferrari had been working with legendary engineer Vittorio Jano on small-displacement V6 racing engines that translated into successful racing cars, but Dino died of muscular dystrophy and never saw his ideas realized with the very successful road-going Dino. As was often the case with Ferrari (and other ?small manufacturers), building the required production run of 500 vehicles to meet the homologation rules was problematic so, for the new 1.6-litre Formula 2 series in 1967, Ferrari turned to Fiat for production ?and to up the numbers. Sergio Pininfarina was commissioned to build a concept for the 1965 Paris Salon and a refined Dino 206S featured at the 1966 Turin motor show. The reaction was very favourable, ?so Dino 206GT production followed the year after. The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears, transforming it from a small manufacturer of racing cars and expensive road cars into a specialist manufacturer of racing cars, expensive exotics and more affordable sports cars. In 1969 Fiat took commercial control of Ferrari, allowing Enzo to concentrate on his first love – motor racing – while considerably expanding the company and allowing it to grow into the success it is today. With the new Dino costing some £5500 against the big-gun 365GTB/4 Daytona’s £9000, it’s no wonder ?the small Ferrari (priced similarly to the Porsche 911) took off the way it did. Just 157 examples of the ?all-aluminium 2.0-litre 206GT were manufactured in ’68 and ’69 before Ferrari realised that improvements were required to sustain the sales trajectory. The steel-bodied 246GT was introduced in 1970, with a larger 2.4-litre engine that upped the horsepower from a screaming 160bhp at 8000rpm to a gruntier 195bhp at a still heady 7600rpm. Importantly, torque followed suit, from 138lb ft at 6500rpm to 166lb ft at 5500rpm. Weight rose too, to 1077kg, a tad more than the Porsche 911 of the day, but performance also improved considerably, with the 0-60mph sprint taking seven seconds and a top speed of 143mph. The 1972 Giallo Fly Ferrari Dino 246GT you see ?here belongs to Capetonian Dickon Daggit. Daggit is a leading light in the historic racing scene in the Cape ?and has raced his Cooper Bristol at Monaco and Goodwood. He has owned his Dino since 1981. ‘Of all the cars I own, this will be the last one to go,’ he says. ‘Not only is it beautiful to look at, it’s a classic that’s quick, handles superbly and does everything I want in a sports car. I regard it as being one of the most important road-going Ferraris ever, even if the Dino GT only actually received the Ferrari badge once the model was launched in America.’ And there’s the crucial point. Informed motoring collectors such as Dickon Daggit consider the Dino to be a proper and seminal Ferrari. But because Dinos were half the price of the bigger V12 Ferraris when new, many of them had harder lives and multiple ownership. Rust, unreliability and expensive, high-maintenance servicing costs dragged their values down to the point where they became ‘cheap Ferraris’, an oxymoron that led to neglect and demise in many cases. Dinos were abused, smoked around and lost much of their value. When the classic car phenomenon took hold in the 1970s, 275GTBs, 365GTCs and Daytonas increased in value and, come the crash of 1989, a Daytona was worth four times as much as a good Dino. But things have changed since then and today a good Dino is worth almost as much as a solid Daytona: say about £130,000. The Ferrari Dino is now as respected and collectable as any of the big V12s and having its engine mounted behind the cockpit is no longer a negative. After all, it became the way of many Ferraris. The sublimely beautiful Dino Berlinetta and Spider were followed by the less classical, more angular Bertone-styled Dino 308GT4 in 1974. It was never considered to be one of Ferrari’s finest creations, yet its V8-engined heart founded a theme for every ?junior Ferrari that followed, starting in 1975 with the superb 308 (as featured in Octane issue 83), which morphed into the 328, then the tricky and nervous ?348 of 1989. This was the low point for the junior mid-engined Ferraris, as the company appeared to be concentrating its skills on the larger Testarossa and 512TR, the magnificent 288GTO and the ballistic F40. But in 1994 Ferrari focused anew and came up with the F355. The best mid-engined, smaller-displacement Ferrari since the original Dino, the F355 was met with enthusiasm by both the press and Ferrari owners, who once again had a compact and wieldy sports car to enjoy thrashing along their favourite roads. Adam Blow brought along his immaculate 1996 F355 Berlinetta to pit against Daggit’s Dino and together they make a fine pair. Both designed by Pininfarina, these are two of the best-looking Ferraris ever created. The F355 has obviously moved on from the 246 and its specs are very impressive. It is the first Ferrari to feature five valves per cylinder (three intake and two exhaust valves) and its 3.5-litre V8 engine thumps out 380 stallions at 8250rpm. This translates to 109bhp per litre, an even higher specific output than the legendary McLaren F1’s 103bhp per litre. Performance? Little-league no longer, thanks to 0-60mph in 4.5sec and a top speed of 178mph. That’s properly fast, even today. The fabulous 90-degree V8 is complemented by ?one of the most sophisticated exhaust systems of the ?time, which has a wastegate that opens at high revs ?to reduce back-pressure and, unfettered, allow an extra 20bhp. How exuberant and typically Ferrari – yet it is balanced by a cool and efficient Bosch Motronic engine management system, a six-speed gearbox ?with tightly stacked ratios, underbody aerodynamics with twin diffusers at the rear, electronically adjustable dampers, and proper racing car-style double wishbones at each corner. The upshot is that Ferrari not only moved its F355 emphatically ahead of the 911 and Honda NSX opposition, it pushed the car straight into the jaws of the senior class dominated by the V12 Ferrari 512TR and the thunderous Lamborghini Diablo VT. Road ?tests of the time attested to the F355 being faster to 100mph than both, with the same time to the one kilometre post and a top speed almost identical to the 512’s. Bravissimo! We meet on a hot 38-degree day at Hout Bay. Victoria Road snakes along the peninsular towards Camps Bay and Clifton beach, providing one of the world’s most beautiful motoring backdrops. The cold Atlantic Ocean crashes onto the rocks on one side, while verdant mountain ranges including the Twelve Apostles, Lion’s Head and the rear of Table Mountain soar up towards the bright blue sky on the other. The smooth tarmac ribbon dips and rises past the breaking waves and offers fast and flowing third- and fourth-gear corners with a couple of clear dual carriageway sections ?where the throttle pedals can be planted. Rightfully, we start with Daggit’s Dino 246GT. It shimmers in the bright and unrelenting sunlight, sitting low on its old-tech 205/70 XWX Michelin tyres, the bodywork stretched voluptuously yet tautly over its tubular steel frame. The mid-mounted engine requires two flared nostrils on either side to feed cold air, and the front and rear lids are perforated with gills. You open the driver’s door with the dinky little curled handle, about the size of a nail clipper, and slump down into the driving seat. It is reclined at a comical angle, like a deckchair, and has no rake adjustment. Lying almost prone, you look over the instrument binnacle full of optimistically rated Veglia dials and up over the high-arching front wings. The Dino has been chuntering about for photos in the searing heat, but a press on the throttle pedal and a twist of the key gets the starter slurring and the three twin-choke Webers feeding without fuss. A dab of throttle elicits a fierce bark, as the race-derived 2.4-litre, chain-driven double overhead-cam engine clears its throats. Without having even moved off ?the mark, you know this is going to be a full-volume Ferrari experience. The clutch is firm and short but has a precise bite. The dog-leg five-speed shifter is typically sticky at ?low speeds and is heavy in comparison to a modern car’s. The Dino moves off, proffering an unexpected flow of gentle torque. Changes up through the ’box get sweeter as the speed rises and the car responds instantly and accurately to the superbly alive steering through the beautifully crafted wheel. Visibility is good, steering near-perfect, brakes ?need a good shove to get their attention but are then easy to modulate and the ride flows thanks to the ?all-wishbone, coil-spring suspension. The V6 engine ?is mounted transversely in the chassis, with the ?gearbox beneath it and the diff behind, so the mass ?is concentrated well within the wheelbase. And that becomes apparent as soon as you get into the groove. Turning into corners the Dino initially understeers, but add some throttle and the rear end squats and ?the car starts to work from the seat of your pants. Load up the XWXs, start to push and the Dino responds beautifully, seeming to get down and clamp itself to the tarmac like an angry Cape Cobra. It darts from one apex to the next, hugging the best line with precision. With the enthusiastic little V6 engine revving orchestrally behind you, the Ferrari can be thrown at every corner as fast as you like. The now-hot discs offer delicious feel as you brake later and later, guiding the Dino via its communicative steering while feeling ?it pivot about your hips, as the suspension does an excellent job of dispensing with any interfering undulations. You become one with this car and it flatters the driver, probably because the sublime chassis could clearly handle a whole lot more power. So now we move to the more powerful young ?blood; the supercar. And make no mistake, the F355 ?is most certainly a supercar even if, today, a good, ?pre-owned example can be had for the relatively affordable (against a Dino) sum of £40,000-45,000 – prices that, having moved north over the last year or two, already prove that interest in the F355 is increasing. The best thing? Even at that money, it’s still an absolute bargain for what’s on offer. Adam Blow’s F355 Berlinetta looks fierce in Scarlet. ‘I have a Porsche 993 Turbo as well as this and they are completely different. The Ferrari is a pure supercar but it is useable every day. And every time I drive it, I am reminded how special it is, even when sitting in traffic with the air conditioning on. As a driving enthusiast, I think Ferrari is the ultimate, so my next step is to order a new 458, which I am planning to collect from the factory in Maranello. My dream,’ says Blow. Modern safety regulations and aerodynamic considerations render it less curvaceous than the ?Dino but the 355 is still a dramatic statement with its long nose, side vents, flipped-up tail and signature Ferrari tail lights. As the Dino is diminutive, the 355 is sizable and wide, with a low, ground-hugging front spoiler. It looks honed. Just walking towards the car you can feel the shift from analogue to digital. The 355 is laser-cut, the Dino handcrafted. Having made myself comfortable behind the fat-rimmed steering wheel, the 355 starts instantly. Whirrr, blam, vrrrrrr. Fans blow from under the rear hood where the V8 is mounted longitudinally and the mill produces a flat wall of sound and a swell of heat. Every control feels oiled and accurate even though the pedalbox is offset towards the centre of the car. The drilled aluminium pedals themselves look a bit boy-racer in the otherwise sober and tasteful cabin. You can drive the 355 fast and comfortably, revving it to about five thou, with the radio playing and the ?air-con cooling. But, as advised by owner Blow, things only really start to happen above that. So turn the tunes and chills off, drop two gears via the riflebolt gearshifter and hold on. The 355 gets serious. If the Dino is akin to dancing with a beautiful woman as you guide her across the floor, the F355 is like a work-out with a black-belt karate instructor: precision thwacking with no corner either broached or given. You want the driving seat mounted forward so you can grasp the fat power-assisted steering wheel, then reprogramme your brain to keep up with the speed with which the 355 lunges into the corners. The gears are worth swapping just for the crack and the powerful vented disc brakes slough off speed with disdain. The car crushes the distance between corners with complete authority, and then it takes those corners with insane levels of grip and speed. Simply point and squirt. The superb suspension does the rest as the 355 hunkers down and launches itself through the bends. The first run along the costal road is a blur. So do it again. Concentrate, balance the throttle, gearchanges and braking. Still too much infused information to process, so do it again. More at one with the 355, you delve more deeply into its performance abilities. The fat 225- and 275-section 40-profile tyres mounted on 18-inch rims are not even close to the limit on this road and the 355 could do with a long, closed racetrack ?to get anywhere near its properly exciting edge. Amazingly, the electronic damping control that varies the suspension’s stiffness confers an extremely comfortable ride amid all the high-speed action. Obviously this is not a Dino 246GT versus a F355 Berlinetta road test because, although both are Pininfarina-designed mid-engined Ferraris, they are from totally different eras and are engineered with vastly different technologies – but note that both are Berlinettas, the purist’s choice over the Spider versions. The Dino is charming and so much better than I imagined it might be. The 355 is a true supercar, yet as capable of being a daily commuter as it is pushing the envelope of serious performance. The 355 was never a ‘little’ nor a ‘cheap’ Ferrari, being launched at £83,000, whereas the Dino was perceived as being the ‘small’ Ferrari when first seen in 1969. So I am surprised to find that I would choose the Dino over the fabulous 355. This Dino, like most today, is properly restored and in fine condition so it behaved impeccably in roasting conditions, never losing its cool. And it is just more special than the computerized, extremely loud, heat-venting, hyper machine that is the 355. Nowhere near as fast, the Dino is more seductive than the 355 on real roads. It appeals as a hand built icon rather than a precision instrument. You drive it with your soul whereas the 355 simply requires you to aim it with your brain engaged. You dance with the Dino and spar with the F355. Sure, the 246GT commands a price three times that of a good 355, and that’s no surprise: but don’t be surprised either if the F355 starts edging closer to it.

1996 Ferrari 355 Ferrari F355 SPIDER UNIQUE CLASSIC COLOR 355 SERVICED HRE MANUAL GEARBOX

$84,900.00

Beverly Hills, California

Year 1996

Make Ferrari

Model 355

Category -

Mileage 17800

Posted Over 1 Month

THIS FERRARI CURRENTLY HAS A CLEAR AND UNBRANDED TITLE. (Ebay needs to fix its “Vehicle Title” designation.) Detailed history for this Ferrari outlined below. This is perhaps the rarest and most striking of all F355 Ferrari Spiders. While there are literally thousands of red, yellow and black 355s this is the only classic Le Mans blue over Bordeaux 355 Spider known to exist. This is a classic color combination that was popular on classic Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati from the golden era of motoring and remains so, such so that when Ferrari unveiled its hyper rare F60, of which only 10 of the $2.5 million dollar cars were ever built, it was a blue car with a red interior…much like the 1950s California Spider with the same color combination. Presently on display at the Petersen Museum is the latest Bugatti (nearly $3 million) and it is painted in a nearly identical color combination. When Ferrari/Maserati designer Jason Castriota, who designed the 599, Maserati Birdcage 75th and the Maserati GranTurismo, decided to build a million dollar one-off 599 for his father he too chose blue over red for his personal creation. This Ferrari features the very expensive ($10,000 I’m told) option of the upper dash and steering wheel in red leather along with dark navy blue carpets that contrast beautifully yet subtlety with the red interior and complement the matching blue exterior. The $7,000 HRE wheels really compliment this Ferrari’s color combination while giving much better grip and braking thanks to the larger front and rear high performance tires. The typical shrinking leather dash on the F355 was just addressed with thousands spent on new leather. Similarly, the red leather cover for the top is also new ($1500). The red leather interior, including the very expensive OPTION of a full red leather dash and matching steering wheel (said to be a $10,000 option), is in excellent condition as are the beautifully contrasting navy carpets with matching Ferrari original navy floor mats. A full engine out service was performed less than 1000 miles ago. New hood and trunk struts were installed. There are no sticky parts. Gorgeous $1,000 carbon fiber door sill trim panels have been fitted. (The blue you see on the left side of the engine panel is merely a reflection from the bar: The panel is actually black and matches the panel on the right side.) This Ferrari 355 is in exceptional show condition. The 355 is appreciating and on its way to collector car status. ROAD & TRACK listed it as one of the 10 best looking mid-engined Ferraris of all time, saying it sounds “incredible” and that its “styling has aged well, perhaps looking better than when it was first introduced.” The great Phil Hill described it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever built. Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson said it was “the nicest car I have ever ever driven.” He then said he came back from that drive and decided “I have to have one, I have to have one. I have to.” He then went out and bought one for himself. After buying it he said “it’s still the best car I’ve ever driven.” Richard Hammond recently described the 355 in glowing terms as well in an article (below), echoing Road and Track’s sentiment, stating: “If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived.” A recent 5,600 mile reviewer of the 355 for AutoLog noted: “I’m paraphrasing, but Autoblog reader Paul Dyer asked me one day, ‘Want to drive my 1998 Ferrari F355 Spider from San Jose, California, to me in Newfoundland?’ I'm also paraphrasing and leaving out some colorful but unpublishable language, but essentially I said, "Yes." That's how I ended up on a two-week, 5,600-mile road trip, getting an extensive and intimate look at one of the most spectacular cars of our generation. Here's what I discovered. To paraphrase, you don't even know how badly you want an F355. The F355 Spider is the last beautiful Ferrari. Subsequent stallions are modern and dramatic, the F355 is eternally gorgeous, like Brunelleschi's doors and sunsets in Viareggio. The Iliad would still make sense if you said the Greeks took to ship after a Trojan keyed Menelaus' F355. You cannot say the same about the 348, or even the 458 (though we do love it so). “Road & Track said the F355 had "probably the best sports-car engine ever made." Jeremy Clarkson said it was the best car he'd ever driven. That owner who said he wouldn't recommend it? He's had two, and still uses one as his daily driver.” On Pistonheads it was also said the 355 was the last “truly beautiful” Ferrari. In fact, it’s a common notion that the 355 was the last truly classically pretty Ferrari. The 355 is the last Ferrari built with a throttle cable between the gas pedal and the throttle bodies on the engine and a rod operated manual gearbox. It is the last “small” Ferrari. It is the last traditionally built Ferrari. It is the Ferrari that saved Ferrari and turned its reputation around in the mid-1990s. It is well on its way to being a collector’s Ferrari. See the article below comparing the F355 to the Dino. The 355 is a great investment. It's the end of the Enzo era inspired cars, the last of the hand-built cars and they made very few with just 2,664 six speed manual transmission spiders being made for the world. Compare that to the 360 where Ferrari made more than 13,000 of that model approximately half of which are spiders! This is the end of the small, svelte go-kart like handling Ferraris. It sounds more like an F1 car than any other road Ferrari. It has 5 valve per cylinder and titanium connecting rods. It is the last of the Ferrari with a manual transmission and a true throttle cable as opposed to indirect drive by wire found in the 360 and later cars. It is the best shifting, best driving true sports car from Ferrari bridging the analog cars to digital cars threshold. The 458 spider is an amazing car but it was mass produced, still costs around $250k and only comes with an automatic transmission and drive by wire, doesn't sound as good as the F355, and as a spider doesn't look as good as the F355 with its two giant humps behind the seats. It’s also huge compared to a 355 and takes no driver skill and has far less driver involvement. If you are wanting a true classic Ferrari experience with modern performance capabilities the F355 is the only car that fits the bill. Fast, fun, lightweight, sounds great, great to look at, and by today’s Ferrari standards produced in limited numbers. More fun and nimble than a 550, the other last analog Ferrari. The F355 will only appreciate as a classic in the future. HISTORY This Ferrari currently has a clear title. I have the full history of the car and I have spoken to the prior owner of the vehicle responsible for bringing the car to California. Please read the full history. Here is the history for this Ferrari: The prior California owner, then an Executive with Warner Brothers, purchased the car from Huntingridge Motors in 2005. One evening he was celebrating the conclusion of a work project at a Hotel on the corner of La Cienega Blvd and Beverly Blvd here in Los Angeles. He let the manager from computer animation company they were working with drive his Ferrari as she stated she had never driven a Ferrari before. They sat at a light at that intersection adjacent to the hotel. I have spoken to both the owner and the driver and both state what happened next. Their left turn arrow turned green. She started her left turn and was driving slowly. The owner told her to give it some gas. She gave it only a slight amount of gas. He then instructed her to give it some more gas. By now they were midway through the turn. She gave it a lot more gas just as the car came into its powerband and the car spun as it was already mid-turn. The car was not going very fast as she was just turning left at the intersection where the hotel is located. With the Ferrari fishtailing, the Ferrari’s rear wheel hit the sidewalk. They both got out of the car and were actually relieved to see there was no body damage. Even the wheel itself looked okay but clearly the A-arm had bent as a result of hitting the curb. I have obtained the insurance company photographs which confirm this as well. Not one body panel on the car was damaged, no airbags deployed nor was there any serious damage. All the damage was of the simple bolt-off, bolt-on repair variety that could have been done by a weekend hobbyist. At that time the owner of the Ferrari desired a BMW Z8. So the Ferrari was taken to Ferrari of Beverly Hills, the most expensive place probably in the nation to service and repair a Ferrari. Just as expected, they wrote an over the top Beverly Hills Ferrari repair estimate as each brand new part from their retail price sheet was expensive (and typically more expensive than even other Ferrari dealers). For example, Beverly Hills Ferrari wanted nearly $15,000 to replace the rear suspension corner, which consists of jut four nuts to mount the top and four nuts and bolts to mount the A arms and a complete assembly was then on sale on Ebay for $1,500. Thus, Ferrari of Beverly Hills did what was expected, they wrote a high estimate. Also as expected, Mercury Insurance concluded it would be more cost effective to pay off the car and then sell the car at an auction. As the car still looked very good without any damaged body panels, a new looking interior and super low miles, Mercury calculated it would generate a good auction sale value. What most people don’t realize is that with expensive cars like Ferraris insurance companies are quick to right them off not because the cars are ‘totaled’ but because it makes economic sense for them to do so. By paying the car off and then selling it at an auction Mercury could avoid having to pay other non-repair costs, such as rental car and loss of use of the Ferrari. The owner of the Ferrari would have been entitled to a rental car that was comparable to his Ferrari and here in LA they rent these cars out at more than $1,000 per day. Not only would it take time for BH Ferrari to repair the car but they might have to wait for parts to arrive from Italy, further driving up the rental car costs. Whether a loss of use claim or a rental car cost, renting a Ferrari is typically over $1,000 a day and if the car took four to six weeks to repair which was entirely possible (e.g., waiting for parts from Italy) that cost alone could be in excess of $30,000. As the owner had his eye on a Z8 he was happy to have Mercury “total” his Ferrari. With such a low mileage Ferrari with visibly little damage at all, Mercury believed they could get $45,000 to $50,000 for the Ferrari at an auction and save $30k in rental and loss of use fees and with the owner having “only” paid approximately $70k for the Ferrari, Mercury made a business decision to cut a check and sell the car at an auction. Mercury turned this paper into California’s DMV who then proceeded to issue a branded California title. A gentleman purchased the Ferrari and had it repaired. The Ferrari was registered in Illinois where a clear (non-branded) title was issued. This Ferrari was never issued a branded title because of extensive damage. On the contrary, it was branded simply because Mercury concluded it would be more cost efficient to sell the car at an auction. I have this information straight from Mercury Insurance records, including numerous photos from Mercury Insurance, and from speaking directly with the owner and the driver of the Ferrari. I contacted the State of California about correcting their records and they said they would not. Legal action was then taken against the State of California to correct their records to accurately reflect the truth of what happened and for them to cease falsely representing the car’s history. However, the State of California argued even if their information was false they were nevertheless protected by government immunity statutes and the Judge agreed. The case was dismissed but not before I was able to obtain the car's records. These records show the car was never totaled, was never a salvage vehicle or rebuilt. They all show the mileage is completely accurate. There are many cars on Ebay, including Ferraris, Porsche and Lamborghinis that have had far greater mishaps but have these issues unreported. With this car you know exactly what you are getting thanks to the documented history including photographs. Owners Manual and tool kit included. From CLASSIC DRIVER: Has the Ferrari F355 already become a classic? 22 August 2014 Inheriting the proportions of its predecessor, the Ferrari F355 was outwardly a much better-resolved proposition, both aesthetically and aerodynamically. But beneath the smoother skin were further major advancements, including power steering, variable damping, and a 100cc engine enlargement to 3.5 litres. In revised form, the now-375bhp V8 revved out to 8,500rpm and, even more impressively, conjured more bhp per litre than the V12 in the McLaren F1. “It was also the first truly reliable Ferrari,” adds Hartley Junior. “Unlike the Testarossa and 348, you could invariably put one in for a routine service without being hit with an astronomical bill.”As one era was beginning, another was coming to an end: it was to be the last of the breed to be hand-built, with the 360 and later descendants moving to mass production. “Perhaps this is why it’s similar to the F40 and F50 in the way it follows the trends of the classic car market,” ponders Hartley Junior. “In recent years, values of the 355 have climbed 25-30% – influenced somewhat by the 328 GTS – and I think this will continue to be the case. I can see this particular example being a quarter-of-a-million-pound car within the next 10 years.” “The 355 was a sweet spot in the transition from ‘analogue’ to ‘digital’, blending timeless looks and an honest character with just enough modern influence to make it a tempting proposition today." TOP GEAR AND RICHARD HAMMOND ON THE F355 All the legend, the myth, the history and mystery in the world cannot distract from one single fact when it comes to Ferraris: they have to be pretty. Stat sheets can go on about power-to-weight ratios, structural stiffness, torsional rigidity and exotic materials all day long, but if the car looks like a moose, then it’s a moose - an offence made all the worse if it’s supposed to be a prancing horse. The 348 that preceded the 355 was not an especially ugly car, but it also wasn’t especially pretty. The slats down the side echoed the Testarossa - not a good thing - so it looked dated even when it was brand new. And it certainly wasn’t a hit, performance-wise. In fact, much was made of the news that Honda launched the NSX at the same time, and it appeared to be, in every single way, better than the Ferrari. The 355 was Ferrari’s answer. Beauty and power came together and are still very much in evidence today. I’m not one for getting all gooey about Ferraris in general, but there is undeniably something that happens deep inside when you see that yellow badge on a V8 or a steering-wheel boss. Ferrari: the name carries so much weight, even to those who, like me, have never had - nor wanted - a hat with the brand on it. And, my God, the 355 is pretty. It shared almost every dimension with the 348, but the body was all-new and its sculpting had involved a rumoured 1,800 hours of wind-tunnel testing. But there’s little sense of form following function here; it’s too pretty for that. If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived. Inside, I get a reminder that all Ferraris go through a phase when they are not classic - they’re just old Fezzers. I’d say that the 355 is coming through that and entering the classic stage of its life. In true Ferrari form, the interior has dated well. The layout, the design and the feel of it all scream of their own time and, while not fooling anyone that they were drawn yesterday, still have something to say about their period in car design… almost the definition of a classic, in fact. The mid-mounted 380bhp V8 revs to 8,250rpm and sounds satisfyingly guttural and raucous when it does so. It’s a Ferrari, so while it has to be pretty, it can’t afford to be slow either. And it’s quick, it really is. The headlines, 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183mph, are both perfectly acceptable, thank you. The way it delivers those is what it’s all about. The bark and fizz of the V8, the click-clack through that iconic, shiny H-gate - it’s all there. It’s a Ferrari and feels it. The engine and suspension all received major updates to produce the 355, and the gearbox too, with a six-speed manual operated, of course, through that sculptural gear selector. It feels all those things a Ferrari needs to feel; it’s a taut thoroughbred, and you get the sense too that, once you’ve overcome the inevitable nerves that can flutter at any encounter with any Ferrari, the thing is biddable and usable, with perhaps just a touch of fragility to keep things special. There’s a huge amount of love for the F355, with some claiming it pretty much saved the company from the doldrums in the early Nineties, others that it was the car that finally shifted the old-fashioned and faintly stuffy conviction amongst the Ferraristi that the only ‘proper’ Ferraris were the V12s. Some, including F1 champion Phil Hill, named it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever. A landmark car, then, in the story of a legendary carmaker. COMPARING THE 355 TO THE 246 DINO The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears It used to be that a gentleman driver would only consider a Ferrari with a large and powerful V12 engine mounted up front. Porsche manufactured small, rear-engined sporting cars for the arriviste. ?All that changed when Ferrari launched the Dino, with a mid-mounted V6, and followed it with a succession ?of V8-engined sports cars. Ever since, Ferrari has offered two tiers of performance and style – but the Dino has moved out of the new-money realm into ?the collector-car stratosphere. Could the 1990s F355 be about to follow suit? Ferrari broke from its traditional front-engine philosophy in 1968, when the diminutive Dino appeared. The new model was not even badged a Ferrari; it was simply a Dino 206GT. To make matters worse it was developed along with Fiat, the V6 finding its way under the bonnet of the Fiat Dino Coupé and Spider. Motoring aristocrats such as the Agnellis of this world were about to be joined by successful Luigis who owned lucrative pasta joints. What was Enzo thinking? To be fair, the Old Man wasn’t keen on the mid-engine configuration for road cars – although his 250LM racer had proved to be the future for sports racing cars – as he thought the layout unsafe in the hands of customers. In the 1950s, his son Alfredo Dino Ferrari had been working with legendary engineer Vittorio Jano on small-displacement V6 racing engines that translated into successful racing cars, but Dino died of muscular dystrophy and never saw his ideas realized with the very successful road-going Dino. As was often the case with Ferrari (and other ?small manufacturers), building the required production run of 500 vehicles to meet the homologation rules was problematic so, for the new 1.6-litre Formula 2 series in 1967, Ferrari turned to Fiat for production ?and to up the numbers. Sergio Pininfarina was commissioned to build a concept for the 1965 Paris Salon and a refined Dino 206S featured at the 1966 Turin motor show. The reaction was very favourable, ?so Dino 206GT production followed the year after. The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears, transforming it from a small manufacturer of racing cars and expensive road cars into a specialist manufacturer of racing cars, expensive exotics and more affordable sports cars. In 1969 Fiat took commercial control of Ferrari, allowing Enzo to concentrate on his first love – motor racing – while considerably expanding the company and allowing it to grow into the success it is today. With the new Dino costing some £5500 against the big-gun 365GTB/4 Daytona’s £9000, it’s no wonder ?the small Ferrari (priced similarly to the Porsche 911) took off the way it did. Just 157 examples of the ?all-aluminium 2.0-litre 206GT were manufactured in ’68 and ’69 before Ferrari realised that improvements were required to sustain the sales trajectory. The steel-bodied 246GT was introduced in 1970, with a larger 2.4-litre engine that upped the horsepower from a screaming 160bhp at 8000rpm to a gruntier 195bhp at a still heady 7600rpm. Importantly, torque followed suit, from 138lb ft at 6500rpm to 166lb ft at 5500rpm. Weight rose too, to 1077kg, a tad more than the Porsche 911 of the day, but performance also improved considerably, with the 0-60mph sprint taking seven seconds and a top speed of 143mph. The 1972 Giallo Fly Ferrari Dino 246GT you see ?here belongs to Capetonian Dickon Daggit. Daggit is a leading light in the historic racing scene in the Cape ?and has raced his Cooper Bristol at Monaco and Goodwood. He has owned his Dino since 1981. ‘Of all the cars I own, this will be the last one to go,’ he says. ‘Not only is it beautiful to look at, it’s a classic that’s quick, handles superbly and does everything I want in a sports car. I regard it as being one of the most important road-going Ferraris ever, even if the Dino GT only actually received the Ferrari badge once the model was launched in America.’ And there’s the crucial point. Informed motoring collectors such as Dickon Daggit consider the Dino to be a proper and seminal Ferrari. But because Dinos were half the price of the bigger V12 Ferraris when new, many of them had harder lives and multiple ownership. Rust, unreliability and expensive, high-maintenance servicing costs dragged their values down to the point where they became ‘cheap Ferraris’, an oxymoron that led to neglect and demise in many cases. Dinos were abused, smoked around and lost much of their value. When the classic car phenomenon took hold in the 1970s, 275GTBs, 365GTCs and Daytonas increased in value and, come the crash of 1989, a Daytona was worth four times as much as a good Dino. But things have changed since then and today a good Dino is worth almost as much as a solid Daytona: say about £130,000. The Ferrari Dino is now as respected and collectable as any of the big V12s and having its engine mounted behind the cockpit is no longer a negative. After all, it became the way of many Ferraris. The sublimely beautiful Dino Berlinetta and Spider were followed by the less classical, more angular Bertone-styled Dino 308GT4 in 1974. It was never considered to be one of Ferrari’s finest creations, yet its V8-engined heart founded a theme for every ?junior Ferrari that followed, starting in 1975 with the superb 308 (as featured in Octane issue 83), which morphed into the 328, then the tricky and nervous ?348 of 1989. This was the low point for the junior mid-engined Ferraris, as the company appeared to be concentrating its skills on the larger Testarossa and 512TR, the magnificent 288GTO and the ballistic F40. But in 1994 Ferrari focused anew and came up with the F355. The best mid-engined, smaller-displacement Ferrari since the original Dino, the F355 was met with enthusiasm by both the press and Ferrari owners, who once again had a compact and wieldy sports car to enjoy thrashing along their favourite roads. Adam Blow brought along his immaculate 1996 F355 Berlinetta to pit against Daggit’s Dino and together they make a fine pair. Both designed by Pininfarina, these are two of the best-looking Ferraris ever created. The F355 has obviously moved on from the 246 and its specs are very impressive. It is the first Ferrari to feature five valves per cylinder (three intake and two exhaust valves) and its 3.5-litre V8 engine thumps out 380 stallions at 8250rpm. This translates to 109bhp per litre, an even higher specific output than the legendary McLaren F1’s 103bhp per litre. Performance? Little-league no longer, thanks to 0-60mph in 4.5sec and a top speed of 178mph. That’s properly fast, even today. The fabulous 90-degree V8 is complemented by ?one of the most sophisticated exhaust systems of the ?time, which has a wastegate that opens at high revs ?to reduce back-pressure and, unfettered, allow an extra 20bhp. How exuberant and typically Ferrari – yet it is balanced by a cool and efficient Bosch Motronic engine management system, a six-speed gearbox ?with tightly stacked ratios, underbody aerodynamics with twin diffusers at the rear, electronically adjustable dampers, and proper racing car-style double wishbones at each corner. The upshot is that Ferrari not only moved its F355 emphatically ahead of the 911 and Honda NSX opposition, it pushed the car straight into the jaws of the senior class dominated by the V12 Ferrari 512TR and the thunderous Lamborghini Diablo VT. Road ?tests of the time attested to the F355 being faster to 100mph than both, with the same time to the one kilometre post and a top speed almost identical to the 512’s. Bravissimo! We meet on a hot 38-degree day at Hout Bay. Victoria Road snakes along the peninsular towards Camps Bay and Clifton beach, providing one of the world’s most beautiful motoring backdrops. The cold Atlantic Ocean crashes onto the rocks on one side, while verdant mountain ranges including the Twelve Apostles, Lion’s Head and the rear of Table Mountain soar up towards the bright blue sky on the other. The smooth tarmac ribbon dips and rises past the breaking waves and offers fast and flowing third- and fourth-gear corners with a couple of clear dual carriageway sections ?where the throttle pedals can be planted. Rightfully, we start with Daggit’s Dino 246GT. It shimmers in the bright and unrelenting sunlight, sitting low on its old-tech 205/70 XWX Michelin tyres, the bodywork stretched voluptuously yet tautly over its tubular steel frame. The mid-mounted engine requires two flared nostrils on either side to feed cold air, and the front and rear lids are perforated with gills. You open the driver’s door with the dinky little curled handle, about the size of a nail clipper, and slump down into the driving seat. It is reclined at a comical angle, like a deckchair, and has no rake adjustment. Lying almost prone, you look over the instrument binnacle full of optimistically rated Veglia dials and up over the high-arching front wings. The Dino has been chuntering about for photos in the searing heat, but a press on the throttle pedal and a twist of the key gets the starter slurring and the three twin-choke Webers feeding without fuss. A dab of throttle elicits a fierce bark, as the race-derived 2.4-litre, chain-driven double overhead-cam engine clears its throats. Without having even moved off ?the mark, you know this is going to be a full-volume Ferrari experience. The clutch is firm and short but has a precise bite. The dog-leg five-speed shifter is typically sticky at ?low speeds and is heavy in comparison to a modern car’s. The Dino moves off, proffering an unexpected flow of gentle torque. Changes up through the ’box get sweeter as the speed rises and the car responds instantly and accurately to the superbly alive steering through the beautifully crafted wheel. Visibility is good, steering near-perfect, brakes ?need a good shove to get their attention but are then easy to modulate and the ride flows thanks to the ?all-wishbone, coil-spring suspension. The V6 engine ?is mounted transversely in the chassis, with the ?gearbox beneath it and the diff behind, so the mass ?is concentrated well within the wheelbase. And that becomes apparent as soon as you get into the groove. Turning into corners the Dino initially understeers, but add some throttle and the rear end squats and ?the car starts to work from the seat of your pants. Load up the XWXs, start to push and the Dino responds beautifully, seeming to get down and clamp itself to the tarmac like an angry Cape Cobra. It darts from one apex to the next, hugging the best line with precision. With the enthusiastic little V6 engine revving orchestrally behind you, the Ferrari can be thrown at every corner as fast as you like. The now-hot discs offer delicious feel as you brake later and later, guiding the Dino via its communicative steering while feeling ?it pivot about your hips, as the suspension does an excellent job of dispensing with any interfering undulations. You become one with this car and it flatters the driver, probably because the sublime chassis could clearly handle a whole lot more power. So now we move to the more powerful young ?blood; the supercar. And make no mistake, the F355 ?is most certainly a supercar even if, today, a good, ?pre-owned example can be had for the relatively affordable (against a Dino) sum of £40,000-45,000 – prices that, having moved north over the last year or two, already prove that interest in the F355 is increasing. The best thing? Even at that money, it’s still an absolute bargain for what’s on offer. Adam Blow’s F355 Berlinetta looks fierce in Scarlet. ‘I have a Porsche 993 Turbo as well as this and they are completely different. The Ferrari is a pure supercar but it is useable every day. And every time I drive it, I am reminded how special it is, even when sitting in traffic with the air conditioning on. As a driving enthusiast, I think Ferrari is the ultimate, so my next step is to order a new 458, which I am planning to collect from the factory in Maranello. My dream,’ says Blow. Modern safety regulations and aerodynamic considerations render it less curvaceous than the ?Dino but the 355 is still a dramatic statement with its long nose, side vents, flipped-up tail and signature Ferrari tail lights. As the Dino is diminutive, the 355 is sizable and wide, with a low, ground-hugging front spoiler. It looks honed. Just walking towards the car you can feel the shift from analogue to digital. The 355 is laser-cut, the Dino handcrafted. Having made myself comfortable behind the fat-rimmed steering wheel, the 355 starts instantly. Whirrr, blam, vrrrrrr. Fans blow from under the rear hood where the V8 is mounted longitudinally and the mill produces a flat wall of sound and a swell of heat. Every control feels oiled and accurate even though the pedalbox is offset towards the centre of the car. The drilled aluminium pedals themselves look a bit boy-racer in the otherwise sober and tasteful cabin. You can drive the 355 fast and comfortably, revving it to about five thou, with the radio playing and the ?air-con cooling. But, as advised by owner Blow, things only really start to happen above that. So turn the tunes and chills off, drop two gears via the riflebolt gearshifter and hold on. The 355 gets serious. If the Dino is akin to dancing with a beautiful woman as you guide her across the floor, the F355 is like a work-out with a black-belt karate instructor: precision thwacking with no corner either broached or given. You want the driving seat mounted forward so you can grasp the fat power-assisted steering wheel, then reprogramme your brain to keep up with the speed with which the 355 lunges into the corners. The gears are worth swapping just for the crack and the powerful vented disc brakes slough off speed with disdain. The car crushes the distance between corners with complete authority, and then it takes those corners with insane levels of grip and speed. Simply point and squirt. The superb suspension does the rest as the 355 hunkers down and launches itself through the bends. The first run along the costal road is a blur. So do it again. Concentrate, balance the throttle, gearchanges and braking. Still too much infused information to process, so do it again. More at one with the 355, you delve more deeply into its performance abilities. The fat 225- and 275-section 40-profile tyres mounted on 18-inch rims are not even close to the limit on this road and the 355 could do with a long, closed racetrack ?to get anywhere near its properly exciting edge. Amazingly, the electronic damping control that varies the suspension’s stiffness confers an extremely comfortable ride amid all the high-speed action. Obviously this is not a Dino 246GT versus a F355 Berlinetta road test because, although both are Pininfarina-designed mid-engined Ferraris, they are from totally different eras and are engineered with vastly different technologies – but note that both are Berlinettas, the purist’s choice over the Spider versions. The Dino is charming and so much better than I imagined it might be. The 355 is a true supercar, yet as capable of being a daily commuter as it is pushing the envelope of serious performance. The 355 was never a ‘little’ nor a ‘cheap’ Ferrari, being launched at £83,000, whereas the Dino was perceived as being the ‘small’ Ferrari when first seen in 1969. So I am surprised to find that I would choose the Dino over the fabulous 355. This Dino, like most today, is properly restored and in fine condition so it behaved impeccably in roasting conditions, never losing its cool. And it is just more special than the computerized, extremely loud, heat-venting, hyper machine that is the 355. Nowhere near as fast, the Dino is more seductive than the 355 on real roads. It appeals as a hand built icon rather than a precision instrument. You drive it with your soul whereas the 355 simply requires you to aim it with your brain engaged. You dance with the Dino and spar with the F355. Sure, the 246GT commands a price three times that of a good 355, and that’s no surprise: but don’t be surprised either if the F355 starts edging closer to it.

1996 Ferrari 355 Ferrari F355 SPIDER UNIQUE CLASSIC COLOR 355 SERVICED HRE TUBI MANUAL GEARBOX

$79,900.00

Beverly Hills, California

Year 1996

Make Ferrari

Model 355

Category -

Mileage 17800

Posted Over 1 Month

ZFFXR48AXT0105109 VIDEO TAKEN IN BRIGHT SUNLIGHT WITH CELL PHONE CAMERA--RED INTERIOR IS NOT QUITE SO BRIGHT RED IN PERSON. PHOTOS GIVE BETTER INDICATION OF THE ACTUAL COLOR--GOAL WAS TO CAPTURE THE CAR'S PAINT FINISH. Detailed history for this Ferrari outlined below. This is perhaps the rarest and most striking of all F355 Ferrari Spiders. While there are literally thousands of red, yellow and black 355s this is the only classic Le Mans blue over Bordeaux 355 Spider known to exist. This is a classic color combination that was popular on classic Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati from the golden era of motoring and remains so, such so that when Ferrari unveiled its hyper rare F60, of which only 10 of the $2.5 million dollar cars were ever built, it was a blue car with a red interior…much like the 1950s California Spider with the same color combination. Presently on display at the Peterson Museum is the latest Bugatti finished in the same color combination. When Ferrari/Maserati designer Jason Castriota, who designed the 599, Maserati Birdcage 75th and the Maserati GranTurismo, decided to build a million dollar one-off 599 for his father he too chose blue over red for his personal creation. This Ferrari features the very expensive ($10,000 I’m told) option of the upper dash and steering wheel in red leather along with dark navy blue carpets that contrast beautifully yet subtlety with the red interior and complement the matching blue exterior. The $7,000 HRE wheels really compliment this Ferrari’s color combination while giving much better grip and braking thanks to the larger front and rear high performance tires. A Tubi exhaust system is included along with the factory exhaust for that amazing Formula 1 race car sound. The typical shrinking leather dash on the F355 was just addressed with thousands spent on new leather. Similarly, the red leather cover for the top is also new ($1500). The red leather interior, including the very expensive OPTION of a full red leather dash and matching steering wheel (said to be a $10,000 option), is in excellent condition as are the beautifully contrasting navy carpets with matching Ferrari original navy floor mats. A full engine out service was performed less than 1000 miles ago. New hood and trunk struts were installed. There are no sticky parts. Gorgeous $1,000 carbon fiber door sill trim panels have been fitted. (The blue you see on the left side of the engine panel is merely a reflection from the bar: The panel is actually black and matches the panel on the right side.) This Ferrari 355 is in exceptional show condition. The 355 is appreciating and on its way to collector car status. ROAD & TRACK listed it as one of the 10 best looking mid-engined Ferraris of all time, saying it sounds “incredible” and that its “styling has aged well, perhaps looking better than when it was first introduced.” The great Phil Hill described it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever built. Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson said it was “the nicest car I have ever ever driven.” He then said he came back from that drive and decided “I have to have one, I have to have one. I have to.” He then went out and bought one for himself! After buying it he said “it’s still the best car I’ve ever driven.” Richard Hammond recently described the 355 in glowing terms as well in an article (below), echoing Road and Track’s sentiment, stating: “If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived.” A recent 5,600 mile reviewer of the 355 for AutoLog noted: “I’m paraphrasing, but Autoblog reader Paul Dyer asked me one day, ‘Want to drive my 1998 Ferrari F355 Spider from San Jose, California, to me in Newfoundland?’ I'm also paraphrasing and leaving out some colorful but unpublishable language, but essentially I said, "Yes." That's how I ended up on a two-week, 5,600-mile road trip, getting an extensive and intimate look at one of the most spectacular cars of our generation. Here's what I discovered. To paraphrase, you don't even know how badly you want an F355. The F355 Spider is the last beautiful Ferrari. Subsequent stallions are modern and dramatic, the F355 is eternally gorgeous, like Brunelleschi's doors and sunsets in Viareggio. The Iliad would still make sense if you said the Greeks took to ship after a Trojan keyed Menelaus' F355. You cannot say the same about the 348, or even the 458 (though we do love it so). “Road & Track said the F355 had "probably the best sports-car engine ever made." Jeremy Clarkson said it was the best car he'd ever driven. That owner who said he wouldn't recommend it? He's had two, and still uses one as his daily driver.” On Pistonheads it was also said the 355 was the last “truly beautiful” Ferrari. In fact, it’s a common notion that the 355 was the last truly classically pretty Ferrari. The 355 is the last Ferrari built with a throttle cable between the gas pedal and the throttle bodies on the engine and a rod operated manual gearbox. It is the last “small” Ferrari. It is the last traditionally built Ferrari. It is the Ferrari that saved Ferrari and turned its reputation around in the mid-1990s. It is well on its way to being a collector’s Ferrari. See the article below comparing the F355 to the Dino. The 355 is a great investment. It's the end of the Enzo era inspired cars, the last of the hand-built cars and they made very few with just 2,664 six speed manual transmission spiders being made for the world. Compare that to the 360 where Ferrari made more than 13,000 of that model approximately half of which are spiders! This is the end of the small, svelte go-kart like handling Ferraris. It sounds more like an F1 car than any other road Ferrari. It has 5 valve per cylinder and titanium connecting rods. It is the last of the Ferrari with a manual transmission and a true throttle cable as opposed to indirect drive by wire found in the 360 and later cars. It is the best shifting, best driving true sports car from Ferrari bridging the analog cars to digital cars threshold. The 458 spider is an amazing car but it was mass produced, still costs around $250k and only comes with an automatic transmission and drive by wire, doesn't sound as good as the F355, and as a spider doesn't look as good as the F355 with its two giant humps behind the seats. It’s also huge compared to a 355 and takes no driver skill and has far less driver involvement. If you are wanting a true classic Ferrari experience with modern performance capabilities the F355 is the only car that fits the bill. Fast, fun, lightweight, sounds great, great to look at, and by today’s Ferrari standards produced in limited numbers. More fun and nimble than a 550, the other last analog Ferrari. The F355 will only appreciate as a classic in the future. HISTORY This Ferrari currently has a clear title. I have the full history of the car and I have spoken to the prior owner of the vehicle responsible for bringing the car to California. Please read the full history. Here is the history for this Ferrari: The prior California owner, then an Executive with Warner Brothers, purchased the car from Huntingridge Motors in 2005. One evening he was celebrating the conclusion of a work project at a Hotel on the corner of La Cienega Blvd and Beverly Blvd here in Los Angeles. He let the manager from computer animation company they were working with drive his Ferrari. They sat at a light at that intersection adjacent to the hotel. I have spoken to both the owner and the driver and both state what happened next. Their left turn arrow turned green. She started her left turn and was driving very slowly. The owner told her to give it some gas and she gave it only a slight amount of gas. He then instructed her to give it some more gas. By now they were midway through the turn. She gave it a lot more gas just as the car came into its powerband and the car spun as it was already mid-turn. The car was not going very fast as it she was just turning left at the intersection where the hotel was. With the Ferrari fishtailing, the Ferrari’s rear wheel hit the sidewalk. That was it. They both got out of the car and were actually relieved to see there was no body damage. Even the wheel itself looked okay but clearly the A-arm had bent as a result of hitting the curb. I have obtained the insurance company photographs which confirm this as well. Not one body panel on the car was damaged, no airbags deployed nor was there any serious damage. All the damage was of the simple bolt-off, bolt-on repair variety. At that time the owner had decided he wanted a BMW Z8. So the Ferrari was taken to Ferrari of Beverly Hills, the most expensive place probably in the nation to service and repair a Ferrari. Just as expected, they wrote a substantial estimate as each brand new part from their retail price sheet was expensive (and typically more expensive than even other Ferrari dealers). They even stated on the estimate that the removable subframe needed to be replaced and at a huge expense. Yet the subframe did not need to be removed or replaced which is readily verifiable. Thus, Ferrari of Beverly Hills did what was expected, they wrote a high estimate. Also as expected, Mercury Insurance concluded it would be more cost effective to pay off the car and then sell the car at an auction. As the car still looked very good without any damaged body panels, a new looking interior and super low miles, Mercury calculated it would generate a good auction sale value. By paying the car off and then selling it at an auction Mercury could avoid having to pay other non-repair costs, such as rental car and loss of use of the Ferrari. Mercury would have had to have paid for a rental car that was comparable to the Ferrari while the car was being repaired. Whether a loss of use claim or a rental car cost, renting a Ferrari is typically over $1,000 a day and if the car took four weeks to repair which was entirely possible (e.g., waiting for parts from Italy) that cost alone could be in excess of $30,000. As the owner had his eye on a Z8 he was happy to have Mercury “total” his Ferrari. With Mercury thinking they could get $45,000 to $50,000 for the Ferrari at an auction and save $30k in rental and loss of use fees and with the owner having “only” paid approximately $70k for the Ferrari, Mercury made a business decision to cut a check and sell the car at an auction. Mercury turned this paper into California’s DMV who then proceeded to issue a branded California title. A gentleman purchased the Ferrari and had it repaired and titled in his home state of Illinois where a non-branded title was issued. This Ferrari was not issued a branded title because of extensive damage. On the contrary, it was branded simply because Mercury concluded it would be more cost efficient to sell the car at an auction. I have this information straight from Mercury Insurance records, including numerous photos from Mercury Insurance, and from speaking directly with the owner and the driver of the Ferrari. Owners Manual and tool kit included. From CLASSIC DRIVER: Has the Ferrari F355 already become a classic? 22 August 2014 Inheriting the proportions of its predecessor, the Ferrari F355 was outwardly a much better-resolved proposition, both aesthetically and aerodynamically. But beneath the smoother skin were further major advancements, including power steering, variable damping, and a 100cc engine enlargement to 3.5 litres. In revised form, the now-375bhp V8 revved out to 8,500rpm and, even more impressively, conjured more bhp per litre than the V12 in the McLaren F1. “It was also the first truly reliable Ferrari,” adds Hartley Junior. “Unlike the Testarossa and 348, you could invariably put one in for a routine service without being hit with an astronomical bill.”As one era was beginning, another was coming to an end: it was to be the last of the breed to be hand-built, with the 360 and later descendants moving to mass production. “Perhaps this is why it’s similar to the F40 and F50 in the way it follows the trends of the classic car market,” ponders Hartley Junior. “In recent years, values of the 355 have climbed 25-30% – influenced somewhat by the 328 GTS – and I think this will continue to be the case. I can see this particular example being a quarter-of-a-million-pound car within the next 10 years.” “The 355 was a sweet spot in the transition from ‘analogue’ to ‘digital’, blending timeless looks and an honest character with just enough modern influence to make it a tempting proposition today." TOP GEAR AND RICHARD HAMMOND ON THE F355 All the legend, the myth, the history and mystery in the world cannot distract from one single fact when it comes to Ferraris: they have to be pretty. Stat sheets can go on about power-to-weight ratios, structural stiffness, torsional rigidity and exotic materials all day long, but if the car looks like a moose, then it’s a moose - an offence made all the worse if it’s supposed to be a prancing horse. The 348 that preceded the 355 was not an especially ugly car, but it also wasn’t especially pretty. The slats down the side echoed the Testarossa - not a good thing - so it looked dated even when it was brand new. And it certainly wasn’t a hit, performance-wise. In fact, much was made of the news that Honda launched the NSX at the same time, and it appeared to be, in every single way, better than the Ferrari. The 355 was Ferrari’s answer. Beauty and power came together and are still very much in evidence today. I’m not one for getting all gooey about Ferraris in general, but there is undeniably something that happens deep inside when you see that yellow badge on a V8 or a steering-wheel boss. Ferrari: the name carries so much weight, even to those who, like me, have never had - nor wanted - a hat with the brand on it. And, my God, the 355 is pretty. It shared almost every dimension with the 348, but the body was all-new and its sculpting had involved a rumoured 1,800 hours of wind-tunnel testing. But there’s little sense of form following function here; it’s too pretty for that. If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived. Inside, I get a reminder that all Ferraris go through a phase when they are not classic - they’re just old Fezzers. I’d say that the 355 is coming through that and entering the classic stage of its life. In true Ferrari form, the interior has dated well. The layout, the design and the feel of it all scream of their own time and, while not fooling anyone that they were drawn yesterday, still have something to say about their period in car design… almost the definition of a classic, in fact. The mid-mounted 380bhp V8 revs to 8,250rpm and sounds satisfyingly guttural and raucous when it does so. It’s a Ferrari, so while it has to be pretty, it can’t afford to be slow either. And it’s quick, it really is. The headlines, 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183mph, are both perfectly acceptable, thank you. The way it delivers those is what it’s all about. The bark and fizz of the V8, the click-clack through that iconic, shiny H-gate - it’s all there. It’s a Ferrari and feels it. The engine and suspension all received major updates to produce the 355, and the gearbox too, with a six-speed manual operated, of course, through that sculptural gear selector. It feels all those things a Ferrari needs to feel; it’s a taut thoroughbred, and you get the sense too that, once you’ve overcome the inevitable nerves that can flutter at any encounter with any Ferrari, the thing is biddable and usable, with perhaps just a touch of fragility to keep things special. There’s a huge amount of love for the F355, with some claiming it pretty much saved the company from the doldrums in the early Nineties, others that it was the car that finally shifted the old-fashioned and faintly stuffy conviction amongst the Ferraristi that the only ‘proper’ Ferraris were the V12s. Some, including F1 champion Phil Hill, named it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever. A landmark car, then, in the story of a legendary carmaker. COMPARING THE 355 TO THE 246 DINO The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears It used to be that a gentleman driver would only consider a Ferrari with a large and powerful V12 engine mounted up front. Porsche manufactured small, rear-engined sporting cars for the arriviste. ?All that changed when Ferrari launched the Dino, with a mid-mounted V6, and followed it with a succession ?of V8-engined sports cars. Ever since, Ferrari has offered two tiers of performance and style – but the Dino has moved out of the new-money realm into ?the collector-car stratosphere. Could the 1990s F355 be about to follow suit? Ferrari broke from its traditional front-engine philosophy in 1968, when the diminutive Dino appeared. The new model was not even badged a Ferrari; it was simply a Dino 206GT. To make matters worse it was developed along with Fiat, the V6 finding its way under the bonnet of the Fiat Dino Coupé and Spider. Motoring aristocrats such as the Agnellis of this world were about to be joined by successful Luigis who owned lucrative pasta joints. What was Enzo thinking? To be fair, the Old Man wasn’t keen on the mid-engine configuration for road cars – although his 250LM racer had proved to be the future for sports racing cars – as he thought the layout unsafe in the hands of customers. In the 1950s, his son Alfredo Dino Ferrari had been working with legendary engineer Vittorio Jano on small-displacement V6 racing engines that translated into successful racing cars, but Dino died of muscular dystrophy and never saw his ideas realized with the very successful road-going Dino. As was often the case with Ferrari (and other ?small manufacturers), building the required production run of 500 vehicles to meet the homologation rules was problematic so, for the new 1.6-litre Formula 2 series in 1967, Ferrari turned to Fiat for production ?and to up the numbers. Sergio Pininfarina was commissioned to build a concept for the 1965 Paris Salon and a refined Dino 206S featured at the 1966 Turin motor show. The reaction was very favourable, ?so Dino 206GT production followed the year after. The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears, transforming it from a small manufacturer of racing cars and expensive road cars into a specialist manufacturer of racing cars, expensive exotics and more affordable sports cars. In 1969 Fiat took commercial control of Ferrari, allowing Enzo to concentrate on his first love – motor racing – while considerably expanding the company and allowing it to grow into the success it is today. With the new Dino costing some £5500 against the big-gun 365GTB/4 Daytona’s £9000, it’s no wonder ?the small Ferrari (priced similarly to the Porsche 911) took off the way it did. Just 157 examples of the ?all-aluminium 2.0-litre 206GT were manufactured in ’68 and ’69 before Ferrari realised that improvements were required to sustain the sales trajectory. The steel-bodied 246GT was introduced in 1970, with a larger 2.4-litre engine that upped the horsepower from a screaming 160bhp at 8000rpm to a gruntier 195bhp at a still heady 7600rpm. Importantly, torque followed suit, from 138lb ft at 6500rpm to 166lb ft at 5500rpm. Weight rose too, to 1077kg, a tad more than the Porsche 911 of the day, but performance also improved considerably, with the 0-60mph sprint taking seven seconds and a top speed of 143mph. The 1972 Giallo Fly Ferrari Dino 246GT you see ?here belongs to Capetonian Dickon Daggit. Daggit is a leading light in the historic racing scene in the Cape ?and has raced his Cooper Bristol at Monaco and Goodwood. He has owned his Dino since 1981. ‘Of all the cars I own, this will be the last one to go,’ he says. ‘Not only is it beautiful to look at, it’s a classic that’s quick, handles superbly and does everything I want in a sports car. I regard it as being one of the most important road-going Ferraris ever, even if the Dino GT only actually received the Ferrari badge once the model was launched in America.’ And there’s the crucial point. Informed motoring collectors such as Dickon Daggit consider the Dino to be a proper and seminal Ferrari. But because Dinos were half the price of the bigger V12 Ferraris when new, many of them had harder lives and multiple ownership. Rust, unreliability and expensive, high-maintenance servicing costs dragged their values down to the point where they became ‘cheap Ferraris’, an oxymoron that led to neglect and demise in many cases. Dinos were abused, smoked around and lost much of their value. When the classic car phenomenon took hold in the 1970s, 275GTBs, 365GTCs and Daytonas increased in value and, come the crash of 1989, a Daytona was worth four times as much as a good Dino. But things have changed since then and today a good Dino is worth almost as much as a solid Daytona: say about £130,000. The Ferrari Dino is now as respected and collectable as any of the big V12s and having its engine mounted behind the cockpit is no longer a negative. After all, it became the way of many Ferraris. The sublimely beautiful Dino Berlinetta and Spider were followed by the less classical, more angular Bertone-styled Dino 308GT4 in 1974. It was never considered to be one of Ferrari’s finest creations, yet its V8-engined heart founded a theme for every ?junior Ferrari that followed, starting in 1975 with the superb 308 (as featured in Octane issue 83), which morphed into the 328, then the tricky and nervous ?348 of 1989. This was the low point for the junior mid-engined Ferraris, as the company appeared to be concentrating its skills on the larger Testarossa and 512TR, the magnificent 288GTO and the ballistic F40. But in 1994 Ferrari focused anew and came up with the F355. The best mid-engined, smaller-displacement Ferrari since the original Dino, the F355 was met with enthusiasm by both the press and Ferrari owners, who once again had a compact and wieldy sports car to enjoy thrashing along their favourite roads. Adam Blow brought along his immaculate 1996 F355 Berlinetta to pit against Daggit’s Dino and together they make a fine pair. Both designed by Pininfarina, these are two of the best-looking Ferraris ever created. The F355 has obviously moved on from the 246 and its specs are very impressive. It is the first Ferrari to feature five valves per cylinder (three intake and two exhaust valves) and its 3.5-litre V8 engine thumps out 380 stallions at 8250rpm. This translates to 109bhp per litre, an even higher specific output than the legendary McLaren F1’s 103bhp per litre. Performance? Little-league no longer, thanks to 0-60mph in 4.5sec and a top speed of 178mph. That’s properly fast, even today. The fabulous 90-degree V8 is complemented by ?one of the most sophisticated exhaust systems of the ?time, which has a wastegate that opens at high revs ?to reduce back-pressure and, unfettered, allow an extra 20bhp. How exuberant and typically Ferrari – yet it is balanced by a cool and efficient Bosch Motronic engine management system, a six-speed gearbox ?with tightly stacked ratios, underbody aerodynamics with twin diffusers at the rear, electronically adjustable dampers, and proper racing car-style double wishbones at each corner. The upshot is that Ferrari not only moved its F355 emphatically ahead of the 911 and Honda NSX opposition, it pushed the car straight into the jaws of the senior class dominated by the V12 Ferrari 512TR and the thunderous Lamborghini Diablo VT. Road ?tests of the time attested to the F355 being faster to 100mph than both, with the same time to the one kilometre post and a top speed almost identical to the 512’s. Bravissimo! We meet on a hot 38-degree day at Hout Bay. Victoria Road snakes along the peninsular towards Camps Bay and Clifton beach, providing one of the world’s most beautiful motoring backdrops. The cold Atlantic Ocean crashes onto the rocks on one side, while verdant mountain ranges including the Twelve Apostles, Lion’s Head and the rear of Table Mountain soar up towards the bright blue sky on the other. The smooth tarmac ribbon dips and rises past the breaking waves and offers fast and flowing third- and fourth-gear corners with a couple of clear dual carriageway sections ?where the throttle pedals can be planted. Rightfully, we start with Daggit’s Dino 246GT. It shimmers in the bright and unrelenting sunlight, sitting low on its old-tech 205/70 XWX Michelin tyres, the bodywork stretched voluptuously yet tautly over its tubular steel frame. The mid-mounted engine requires two flared nostrils on either side to feed cold air, and the front and rear lids are perforated with gills. You open the driver’s door with the dinky little curled handle, about the size of a nail clipper, and slump down into the driving seat. It is reclined at a comical angle, like a deckchair, and has no rake adjustment. Lying almost prone, you look over the instrument binnacle full of optimistically rated Veglia dials and up over the high-arching front wings. The Dino has been chuntering about for photos in the searing heat, but a press on the throttle pedal and a twist of the key gets the starter slurring and the three twin-choke Webers feeding without fuss. A dab of throttle elicits a fierce bark, as the race-derived 2.4-litre, chain-driven double overhead-cam engine clears its throats. Without having even moved off ?the mark, you know this is going to be a full-volume Ferrari experience. The clutch is firm and short but has a precise bite. The dog-leg five-speed shifter is typically sticky at ?low speeds and is heavy in comparison to a modern car’s. The Dino moves off, proffering an unexpected flow of gentle torque. Changes up through the ’box get sweeter as the speed rises and the car responds instantly and accurately to the superbly alive steering through the beautifully crafted wheel. Visibility is good, steering near-perfect, brakes ?need a good shove to get their attention but are then easy to modulate and the ride flows thanks to the ?all-wishbone, coil-spring suspension. The V6 engine ?is mounted transversely in the chassis, with the ?gearbox beneath it and the diff behind, so the mass ?is concentrated well within the wheelbase. And that becomes apparent as soon as you get into the groove. Turning into corners the Dino initially understeers, but add some throttle and the rear end squats and ?the car starts to work from the seat of your pants. Load up the XWXs, start to push and the Dino responds beautifully, seeming to get down and clamp itself to the tarmac like an angry Cape Cobra. It darts from one apex to the next, hugging the best line with precision. With the enthusiastic little V6 engine revving orchestrally behind you, the Ferrari can be thrown at every corner as fast as you like. The now-hot discs offer delicious feel as you brake later and later, guiding the Dino via its communicative steering while feeling ?it pivot about your hips, as the suspension does an excellent job of dispensing with any interfering undulations. You become one with this car and it flatters the driver, probably because the sublime chassis could clearly handle a whole lot more power. So now we move to the more powerful young ?blood; the supercar. And make no mistake, the F355 ?is most certainly a supercar even if, today, a good, ?pre-owned example can be had for the relatively affordable (against a Dino) sum of £40,000-45,000 – prices that, having moved north over the last year or two, already prove that interest in the F355 is increasing. The best thing? Even at that money, it’s still an absolute bargain for what’s on offer. Adam Blow’s F355 Berlinetta looks fierce in Scarlet. ‘I have a Porsche 993 Turbo as well as this and they are completely different. The Ferrari is a pure supercar but it is useable every day. And every time I drive it, I am reminded how special it is, even when sitting in traffic with the air conditioning on. As a driving enthusiast, I think Ferrari is the ultimate, so my next step is to order a new 458, which I am planning to collect from the factory in Maranello. My dream,’ says Blow. Modern safety regulations and aerodynamic considerations render it less curvaceous than the ?Dino but the 355 is still a dramatic statement with its long nose, side vents, flipped-up tail and signature Ferrari tail lights. As the Dino is diminutive, the 355 is sizable and wide, with a low, ground-hugging front spoiler. It looks honed. Just walking towards the car you can feel the shift from analogue to digital. The 355 is laser-cut, the Dino handcrafted. Having made myself comfortable behind the fat-rimmed steering wheel, the 355 starts instantly. Whirrr, blam, vrrrrrr. Fans blow from under the rear hood where the V8 is mounted longitudinally and the mill produces a flat wall of sound and a swell of heat. Every control feels oiled and accurate even though the pedalbox is offset towards the centre of the car. The drilled aluminium pedals themselves look a bit boy-racer in the otherwise sober and tasteful cabin. You can drive the 355 fast and comfortably, revving it to about five thou, with the radio playing and the ?air-con cooling. But, as advised by owner Blow, things only really start to happen above that. So turn the tunes and chills off, drop two gears via the riflebolt gearshifter and hold on. The 355 gets serious. If the Dino is akin to dancing with a beautiful woman as you guide her across the floor, the F355 is like a work-out with a black-belt karate instructor: precision thwacking with no corner either broached or given. You want the driving seat mounted forward so you can grasp the fat power-assisted steering wheel, then reprogramme your brain to keep up with the speed with which the 355 lunges into the corners. The gears are worth swapping just for the crack and the powerful vented disc brakes slough off speed with disdain. The car crushes the distance between corners with complete authority, and then it takes those corners with insane levels of grip and speed. Simply point and squirt. The superb suspension does the rest as the 355 hunkers down and launches itself through the bends. The first run along the costal road is a blur. So do it again. Concentrate, balance the throttle, gearchanges and braking. Still too much infused information to process, so do it again. More at one with the 355, you delve more deeply into its performance abilities. The fat 225- and 275-section 40-profile tyres mounted on 18-inch rims are not even close to the limit on this road and the 355 could do with a long, closed racetrack ?to get anywhere near its properly exciting edge. Amazingly, the electronic damping control that varies the suspension’s stiffness confers an extremely comfortable ride amid all the high-speed action. Obviously this is not a Dino 246GT versus a F355 Berlinetta road test because, although both are Pininfarina-designed mid-engined Ferraris, they are from totally different eras and are engineered with vastly different technologies – but note that both are Berlinettas, the purist’s choice over the Spider versions. The Dino is charming and so much better than I imagined it might be. The 355 is a true supercar, yet as capable of being a daily commuter as it is pushing the envelope of serious performance. The 355 was never a ‘little’ nor a ‘cheap’ Ferrari, being launched at £83,000, whereas the Dino was perceived as being the ‘small’ Ferrari when first seen in 1969. So I am surprised to find that I would choose the Dino over the fabulous 355. This Dino, like most today, is properly restored and in fine condition so it behaved impeccably in roasting conditions, never losing its cool. And it is just more special than the computerized, extremely loud, heat-venting, hyper machine that is the 355. Nowhere near as fast, the Dino is more seductive than the 355 on real roads. It appeals as a hand built icon rather than a precision instrument. You drive it with your soul whereas the 355 simply requires you to aim it with your brain engaged. You dance with the Dino and spar with the F355. Sure, the 246GT commands a price three times that of a good 355, and that’s no surprise: but don’t be surprised either if the F355 starts edging closer to it.

Ferrari : 355 FIORANO FERRARI 355 FIORANO #21 OUT OF JUST 100 PRODUCED! AWARD WINNING! MAJOR SERVICE!

$109,000.00

Beverly Hills, California

Year 1999

Make Ferrari

Model 355

Category -

Mileage 26400

Posted Over 1 Month

Offered for sale is one of the rarest modern Ferraris, a multiple award winning, highly collectible, 1999 Ferrari F355 Series Fiorano Special Edition, also known in Italian as the "Serie Fiorano.” Not only is the Fiorano incredibly rare, it also offers significant improvements over the standard 355 Spider. (See below) This Ferrari, VIN: ZFFXR48A1X0115937, is number 21 out of just 100 355 Fioranos ever produced. With just 100 examples produced this is one of the rarest modern Ferraris of all time. According to its prior owner of 10 years, this Ferrari won every event it entered. He states “It has been the top V8, winning both the Otro Cilindri Cup (top v-8 in the country) at Cavallino Concourse d' Elegance as well as 1st place-best in class the following year it has won the over all 1st place cup and best in show at the Ferrari's owners club, Florida region it has won top modern Ferrari at the Winter Park Concourse d' Elegance.” The photo shows awards this Ferrari won according to a prior owner. Unfortunately, at this time I do not have those awards as they were apparently kept by a prior owner. (I am trying to locate the awards but cannot guarantee they will come with the car.) The results of a $517 PPI are shown in one of the photos. (The LED light mentioned as being out is being repaired.) This Ferrari just had a major service completed December 29, 2014. (See PPI photo which details the service work performed.) Ferrari produces around 6,000 cars a year. But with just 100 F355 Series Fiorano produced, this is super rare car even by Ferrari standards. For example: 100—355 Fioranos 350-380—F50s 400-500—Enzos 1,311—F40 ~2,000—430 Scuderia ~1,273—360 CS Challenge Stradale 500—430 16Ms 448—550 Barchetta The Fiorano represents the final F355 produced by Ferrari and was a truly special car; it topped a line which will forever be installed with the pantheon of great cars. The F355 Serie Fiorano's production was limited to a run of 100 cars, all of which are spiders. The Fiorano is easily identified by its lowered stance, the result of a revised suspension based on that of the Competizione racing variant. Further racing influences on this special model are the red brake calipers, racing brake pads, and cross-drilled rotors which compliment the drilled aluminum pedals found within the car. This F355 has the feel of a race car due to reprogrammed electronically-controlled shock absorbers, larger antiroll bars, stiffer springs, and quicker steering ratio. Serie Fiorano is distinguished by interior Carbon Fiber accoutrements, suede-covered steering wheel and a silver plaque inscribed with the car's production number on the dashboard. To distinguish it's limited production the Fiorano's exterior is adorned with a black Challenge rear grill and factory-mandated enamel Scuderia Ferrari shields. These are not the typical glued on variety you see on so many other Ferraris. Instead, these are properly recessed into the fenders by Ferrari. For 1999, Ferrari introduced a limited production of F355 Spider models designated, "Serie Fiorano" Launched in March, 1999, this limited production run of 100 planned units (104 actually produced) included a number of performance enhancements: Here is a list of modifications that make the Fiorano not just a rare car but a more focused driver’s car as well: 1. Red brake calipers 2. Suede steering wheel 3. Dedication number plaque 4. Rear challenge grill 5. Carbon fiber interior accents (Console/trim around radio and three gauges above) 6. Carbon fiber F1 paddles 7. Carbon Fiber center console 8. Scuderia shields recessed in front fenders 9. Competizione-derived Fiorano suspension package-(consists of stiffer front and rear springs, lowered ground height, dedicated set up for the steering device, providing less assistance at low speeds and racing type brake pads mounted on red calipers.) 10. Challenge rack 11. Front/rear challenge roll bar 12. Stiffer rate coil springs 13. Shock ECU specific to Fiorano setup 14. Drilled and ventilated brake discs 15. Carbon Fiber Door Sills This is a rare example of an attractive model with the major belt serviced having recently been completed. The Fiorano edition gives the car tasteful additions and makes its extreme rarity particularly attractive to the collector. With the car comes the owner's manual pack and toolkit. Now is the time to get this car as even the standard 355 is soon to be classic as these Ferraris values are already rising in value. (See Richard Hammond’s commentary below.) The 355 is the what Jeremey Clarkson, the world’s most famous auto journalist called, “the best car I’ve ever driven.” He then went out and bought one for himself! The legendary Phil Hill and only American born racer to be a Formula 1 world champion, said the 355 was one of the top ten Ferraris of all time. The 355 is the last / best true Ferrari. It is the last Ferrari spider that has a true throttle cable connecting your gas peddle directly to the engine. (360 or newer cars use drive by wire). The 355's chassis and engine trace their origins back to Enzo era cars which is perhaps why this car handles like a go kart!. The 355 is classically styled. It is about a foot shorter than a 458, narrower and far more nimble in traffic. The 355 is the last of the traditional Ferraris. It traces its roots to the Enzo era Ferraris. Unlike the newer Ferrari spiders the 355 is a pure sports car. When you press the gas pedal you are actually mechanically moving all eight throttle bodies whereas the new cars are all drive by wire, which is less direct feeling because in the new cars you are no longer actually connected to the drivetrain. It also has something the new Ferraris do not—five valves per cylinder and the sound of an F1 race car! That intimate sports car feeling is gone on the newer Ferraris but its still there on the 355. Hammond drives the icons: The Ferrari 355 The car that saved Ferrari is all set to be a future classic, says Richard Hammond All the legend, the myth, the history and mystery in the world cannot distract from one single fact when it comes to Ferraris: they have to be pretty. Stat sheets can go on about power-to-weight ratios, structural stiffness, torsional rigidity and exotic materials all day long, but if the car looks like a moose, then it's a moose - an offence made all the worse if it's supposed to be a prancing horse. The 348 that preceded the 355 was not an especially ugly car, but it also wasn't especially pretty. The slats down the side echoed the Testarossa - not a good thing - so it looked dated even when it was brand new. And it certainly wasn't a hit, performance-wise. In fact, much was made of the news that Honda launched the NSX at the same time, and it appeared to be, in every single way, better than the Ferrari. The 355 was Ferrari's answer. Beauty and power came together and are still very much in evidence today. I'm not one for getting all gooey about Ferraris in general, but there is undeniably something that happens deep inside when you see that yellow badge on a V8 or a steering-wheel boss. Ferrari: the name carries so much weight, even to those who, like me, have never had - nor wanted - a hat with the brand on it. And, my God, the 355 is pretty. It shared almost every dimension with the 348, but the body was all-new and its sculpting had involved a rumoured 1,800 hours of wind-tunnel testing. But there's little sense of form following function here; it's too pretty for that. If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived. Inside, I get a reminder that all Ferraris go through a phase when they are not classic - they're just old Fezzers. I'd say that the 355 is coming through that and entering the classic stage of its life. In true Ferrari form, the interior has dated well. The layout, the design and the feel of it all scream of their own time and, while not fooling anyone that they were drawn yesterday, still have something to say about their period in car design... almost the definition of a classic, in fact. The mid-mounted 380bhp V8 revs to 8,250rpm and sounds satisfyingly guttural and raucous when it does so. It's a Ferrari, so while it has to be pretty, it can't afford to be slow either. And it's quick, it really is. The headlines, 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183mph, are both perfectly acceptable, thank you. It's a Ferrari and feels it. The engine and suspension all received major updates to produce the 355. It feels all those things a Ferrari needs to feel; it's a taut thoroughbred, and you get the sense too that, once you've overcome the inevitable nerves that can flutter at any encounter with any Ferrari, the thing is biddable and usable, with perhaps just a touch of fragility to keep things special. There's a huge amount of love for the F355, with some claiming it pretty much saved the company from the doldrums in the early Nineties, others that it was the car that finally shifted the old-fashioned and faintly stuffy conviction amongst the Ferraristi that the only ‘proper' Ferraris were the V12s. Some, including F1 champion Phil Hill, named it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever. A landmark car, then, in the story of a legendary carmaker. ANOTHER JOURNALIST NOTES: CAN THE F355 TAKE OVER THE MANTLE OF THE DINO AS THE JUNIOR FERRARI OF CHOICE? Time for a shoot-out in the South African sunshine It used to be that a gentleman driver would only consider a Ferrari with a large and powerful V12 engine mounted up front. Porsche manufactured small, rear-engined sporting cars for the arriviste. ?All that changed when Ferrari launched the Dino, with a mid-mounted V6, and followed it with a succession ?of V8-engined sports cars. Ever since, Ferrari has offered two tiers of performance and style – but the Dino has moved out of the new-money realm into ?the collector-car stratosphere. Could the 1990s F355 be about to follow suit? In 1994 Ferrari focused anew and came up with the F355. The best mid-engined, smaller-displacement Ferrari since the original Dino, the F355 was met with enthusiasm by both the press and Ferrari owners, who once again had a compact and wieldy sports car to enjoy thrashing along their favourite roads. Both designed by Pininfarina, these are two of the best-looking Ferraris ever created. The F355 has obviously moved on from the 246 and its specs are very impressive. It is the first Ferrari to feature five valves per cylinder (three intake and two exhaust valves) and its 3.5-litre V8 engine thumps out 380 stallions at 8250rpm. This translates to 109bhp per litre, an even higher specific output than the legendary McLaren F1’s 103bhp per litre. Performance? Little-league no longer, thanks to 0-60mph in 4.5sec and a top speed of 178mph. That’s properly fast, even today. The fabulous 90-degree V8 is complemented by ?one of the most sophisticated exhaust systems of the ?time, which has a wastegate that opens at high revs ?to reduce back-pressure and, unfettered, allow an extra 20bhp. How exuberant and typically Ferrari – yet it is balanced by a cool and efficient Bosch Motronic engine management system, a six-speed gearbox ?with tightly stacked ratios, underbody aerodynamics with twin diffusers at the rear, electronically adjustable dampers, and proper racing car-style double wishbones at each corner. The upshot is that Ferrari not only moved its F355 emphatically ahead of the 911 and Honda NSX opposition, it pushed the car straight into the jaws of the senior class dominated by the V12 Ferrari 512TR and the thunderous Lamborghini Diablo VT. Road ?tests of the time attested to the F355 being faster to 100mph than both, with the same time to the one kilometre post and a top speed almost identical to the 512’s. Bravissimo! Manke no mistake, the F355 ?is most certainly a supercar even if, today, a good, ?pre-owned example can be had for the relatively affordable (against a Dino) sum of £55,000 – prices that, having moved north over the last year or two, already prove that interest in the F355 is increasing. The best thing? Even at that money, it’s still an absolute bargain for what’s on offer. The Ferrari is a pure supercar but it is useable every day. And every time I drive it, I am reminded how special it is, even when sitting in traffic with the air conditioning on. You can drive the 355 fast and comfortably, revving it to about five thou, with the radio playing and the ?air-con cooling. But, as advised by owner Blow, things only really start to happen above that. So turn the tunes and chills off, drop two gears and hold on. The 355 gets serious. You want the driving seat mounted forward so you can grasp the fat power-assisted steering wheel, then reprogramme your brain to keep up with the speed with which the 355 lunges into the corners. The gears are worth swapping just for the crack and the powerful vented disc brakes slough off speed with disdain. The car crushes the distance between corners with complete authority, and then it takes those corners with insane levels of grip and speed. Simply point and squirt. The superb suspension does the rest as the 355 hunkers down and launches itself through the bends. The first run along the coastal road is a blur. So do it again. Concentrate, balance the throttle, gear-changes and braking. Still too much infused information to process, so do it again. More at one with the 355, you delve more deeply into its performance abilities. The fat 225- and 275-section 40-profile tyres mounted on 18-inch rims are not even close to the limit on this road and the 355 could do with a long, closed racetrack ?to get anywhere near its properly exciting edge. Amazingly, the electronic damping control that varies the suspension’s stiffness confers an extremely comfortable ride amid all the high-speed action. The Dino is charming and so much better than I imagined it might be. The 355 is a true supercar, yet as capable of being a daily commuter as it is pushing the envelope of serious performance. The 355 was never a ‘little’ nor a ‘cheap’ Ferrari, being launched at £83,000, whereas the Dino was perceived as being the ‘small’ Ferrari when first seen in 1969. Sure, the 246GT commands a price three times that of a good 355, and that’s no surprise: but don’t be surprised either if the F355 starts edging closer to it.

Trim SPIDER

Ferrari : 355 Spider 355 ferrari spider best all around upgraded brakes wheels tires seats service

$89,700.00

Beverly Hills, California

Year 1997

Make Ferrari

Model 355

Category -

Mileage 24600

Posted Over 1 Month

This Ferrari spectacular southern California Ferrari is for someone who wants the best all around 355 Ferrari Spider…. and now is the time to get it as these soon to be classic Ferraris are already rising in value. (See Richard Hammond’s commentary below.) The 355 is the what Jeremey Clarkson, the world’s most famous auto journalist called, “the best car I’ve ever driven.” He then went out and bought one for himself! The legendary Phil Hill and only American born racer to be a Formula 1 world champion, said the 355 was one of the top ten Ferraris of all time. This is truly the most stunning looking and driving all around Ferrari 355s thanks to the tasteful upgrades. When I bring this 355 to the shows, Cars and Coffee or Ferrari of Beverly Hills, etc., everyone comments this is the nicest 355 they have ever seen and how the seats, brakes, wheels and tires “transform the car” making it look so much better. Not only is this car stunning looking outside with paint that looks nearly new and a matching interior, but its performance is night and day when compared to a standard 355. New Timing Belt service to be performed upon the sale is included in the price. PAINT The paint has a deep and shiny luster. The car is always garaged and covered. When its driven and parked its parked indoors. If I park it outdoors for more than a few minutes I would cover it. HEATED SEATS ($7800) The OEM seats are not very comfortable and offer little support and they are not heated. They also weigh about 60 pounds each. These seats are super comfy and supportive. They are also heated, which is very nice on those chilly drives with the top down. They weigh about 30 pounds each. That’s a huge weight savings which helps improve the Ferrari’s performance. The seats are from an OEM manufacturer so they are fully DOT and TUV compliant. BRAKES ($11,000) The OEM brakes are tiny by today's standards and this Ferrari features upgraded brakes: Massive 355 millimeter / 14” cross drilled rotors in the front mounted to aluminum hats are clamped down on by far larger brake calipers. In the rear there are 332 mm brake discs also mounted to an aluminum hat and with larger brake calipers. To put this in perspective, the stock 355 has much smaller calipers and rotors, in fact the front rotors are just 300 mm / 12” and they use solid iron hubs. The bigger the disc, the less brake fade and the better stopping. The first time I drove the car with the new brakes it was like night and day. The G forces the car could generate with the new brakes were truly impressive. This 355 will outbreak a 360 or standard 430. WHEELS AND TIRES $9700 The next area of improvement was the wheels and tires. The factory rear tire is a very small 265 mm tire. When test driving the 355, Mario Andretti complained about the rear tires being the weak link in handling. Front tires also do much of the braking. Hence, the bigger the tire, the greater the contact patch the better the turn in and shorter braking distances, and as they say, you can only go as fast as you can stop. It literally took a year to engineer these wheels. The manufacturer sent people to my home to measure, test fit and retest fit these wheels over and over again until the spacing was literally millimeter perfect. The results were worth the weight and expense. They are the largest and relatively speaking lightest wheels ever produced for the 355 and I believe the best looking. They feature titanium hardware and weigh just 24-26.4 pounds and the rears are a whopping 20 x 12.5" yet weight just 26.4 pounds! (For comparison, the much smaller Ferrari 430 wheel is 19”x 10” weighs about 30 pounds.) The front tire has more rubber than the original equipment rear. This Ferrari features the tires up front from the SLR Mercedes super car. It's a specially designed Michelin 255 mm 19" tire that actually has more rubber contact area than a 275 mm tire! In the rear are fitted the largest tires ever known to be fitted to 355. They are 20" 335 mm Michelin steamrollers! A whopping 70 mm increase per tire over stock! To put these specs in perspective, Ferrari's new supercar, the F12, uses 255mm tires up front and 315mm tires in the rear. This 355 has bigger tires than the F12! Not only are they bigger but they are super light wheels and the low profile tires are lighter in weight due to their lower profiles. That said, the car rides as comfortably as stock because there is no increase in unsprung weight. Practically speaking in the real world this means this 355 turns and grips like it's on rails. It stops with unbelievable power and instills tremendous confidence. Experienced Ferrari techs who have driven this 355 state it is like night and day compared to a regular 355. With standard tires you have to be careful on throttle entering turns or highway onramps because the tires are so small you cannot put the all the power down. But with these wheels and tires the grip is immense and you can explore the full potential of the 355, which is breathtaking. Of course, with just 3,000 pounds sitting on all that rubber the tires not only grip like mad but last a long time because they are carrying a relatively light load. In fact, this Ferrari Spider weighs about 500 pounds LESS than the new F12 super car. This car will keep up with a 458 in a real world driving environment at speeds well into the triple digits thanks to its handling, braking and improved power to weight ratio. (First-hand experiences confirm this.) EXHAUST ($4,700) Hi flow metal substrate catalytic converters and a light weight yet great sounding Tubi Exhaust make his car sound like a Formula 1 race car at full throttle. BATTERY Light weight battery further reduces weight and improves performance. NEW CLUTCH AND HILL ENGINEERING THROW OUT BEARING ($2400) A new clutch was recently installed as was an upgraded Hill Engineering throw out bearing. The throw out bearings on these cars eventually fail which is why you they should be upgraded to the Hill Engineering bearing. STEREO The stereo and speakers were upgraded. However, I rarely if ever turn it on. BOOT / COVER FOR THE TOP Features a brand new boot (the leather cover for the top). I'm a perfectionist and wanted a perfect looking cover with super subble leather. CLASSIC AND COLLECTIBLE The 355 is the last / best true Ferrari. It is the last Ferrari spider that has a true throttle cable connecting your gas peddle directly to the engine. (360 or newer cars use drive by wire). It is the last Ferrari spider to have both an accelerator cable and a stick shift that actually has a rod connecting the stick directly to the gearbox. (The 430 uses a far less satisfying cable while the 458 has no stick option at all.) The 355's chassis and engine trace their origins back to Enzo era cars. The 355 is classically styled. It is about a foot shorter than a 458, narrower and far more nimble in traffic. The 355 is the last of the traditional Ferraris. It traces its roots to the Enzo era Ferraris. Unlike the newer Ferrari spiders the 355 is a pure sports car. It is the last mid-engine Ferrari to feature mechanical linkage controlling its throttles and transmission so you have that classic Ferrari shift gate fee. When you press the gas pedal you are actually mechanically moving all eight throttle bodies whereas the new cars are all drive by wire, which is less direct feeling because in the new cars you are no longer actually connected to the drivetrain. It also has something the new Ferraris do not—five valves per cylinder and the sound of an F1 race car. That intimate sports car feeling is gone on the newer Ferraris but its still there on the 355. Sadly Ferrari no longer makes a manual gearbox so these cars will continue to rise. If you want to experience the snick-snick of manual shifting and heel and toe driving while actually being at one with the sports car and an 8500 RPM redline then the F355 Spider is the last traditional Ferrari. It also sounds better than any V8 Ferrari ever made (in my opinion). The 355 is more compact and manageable than later generation Ferraris, sharper looking and drives like a Ferrari race car with the direct feel of a go kart. Hammond drives the icons: The Ferrari 355 The car that saved Ferrari is all set to be a future classic, says Richard Hammond All the legend, the myth, the history and mystery in the world cannot distract from one single fact when it comes to Ferraris: they have to be pretty. Stat sheets can go on about power-to-weight ratios, structural stiffness, torsional rigidity and exotic materials all day long, but if the car looks like a moose, then it's a moose - an offence made all the worse if it's supposed to be a prancing horse. The 348 that preceded the 355 was not an especially ugly car, but it also wasn't especially pretty. The slats down the side echoed the Testarossa - not a good thing - so it looked dated even when it was brand new. And it certainly wasn't a hit, performance-wise. In fact, much was made of the news that Honda launched the NSX at the same time, and it appeared to be, in every single way, better than the Ferrari. The 355 was Ferrari's answer. Beauty and power came together and are still very much in evidence today. I'm not one for getting all gooey about Ferraris in general, but there is undeniably something that happens deep inside when you see that yellow badge on a V8 or a steering-wheel boss. Ferrari: the name carries so much weight, even to those who, like me, have never had - nor wanted - a hat with the brand on it. And, my God, the 355 is pretty. It shared almost every dimension with the 348, but the body was all-new and its sculpting had involved a rumoured 1,800 hours of wind-tunnel testing. But there's little sense of form following function here; it's too pretty for that. If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived. Inside, I get a reminder that all Ferraris go through a phase when they are not classic - they're just old Fezzers. I'd say that the 355 is coming through that and entering the classic stage of its life. In true Ferrari form, the interior has dated well. The layout, the design and the feel of it all scream of their own time and, while not fooling anyone that they were drawn yesterday, still have something to say about their period in car design... almost the definition of a classic, in fact. The mid-mounted 380bhp V8 revs to 8,250rpm and sounds satisfyingly guttural and raucous when it does so. It's a Ferrari, so while it has to be pretty, it can't afford to be slow either. And it's quick, it really is. The headlines, 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183mph, are both perfectly acceptable, thank you. The way it delivers those is what it's all about. The bark and fizz of the V8, the click-clack through that iconic, shiny H-gate - it's all there. It's a Ferrari and feels it. The engine and suspension all received major updates to produce the 355, and the gearbox too, with a six-speed manual operated, of course, through that sculptural gear selector. It feels all those things a Ferrari needs to feel; it's a taut thoroughbred, and you get the sense too that, once you've overcome the inevitable nerves that can flutter at any encounter with any Ferrari, the thing is biddable and usable, with perhaps just a touch of fragility to keep things special. There's a huge amount of love for the F355, with some claiming it pretty much saved the company from the doldrums in the early Nineties, others that it was the car that finally shifted the old-fashioned and faintly stuffy conviction amongst the Ferraristi that the only ‘proper' Ferraris were the V12s. Some, including F1 champion Phil Hill, named it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever. A landmark car, then, in the story of a legendary carmaker. Not bad for around £55k now. ANOTHER JOURNALIST NOTES: CAN THE F355 TAKE OVER THE MANTLE OF THE DINO AS THE JUNIOR FERRARI OF CHOICE? Time for a shoot-out in the South African sunshine It used to be that a gentleman driver would only consider a Ferrari with a large and powerful V12 engine mounted up front. Porsche manufactured small, rear-engined sporting cars for the arriviste. ?All that changed when Ferrari launched the Dino, with a mid-mounted V6, and followed it with a succession ?of V8-engined sports cars. Ever since, Ferrari has offered two tiers of performance and style – but the Dino has moved out of the new-money realm into ?the collector-car stratosphere. Could the 1990s F355 be about to follow suit? In 1994 Ferrari focused anew and came up with the F355. The best mid-engined, smaller-displacement Ferrari since the original Dino, the F355 was met with enthusiasm by both the press and Ferrari owners, who once again had a compact and wieldy sports car to enjoy thrashing along their favourite roads. Both designed by Pininfarina, these are two of the best-looking Ferraris ever created. The F355 has obviously moved on from the 246 and its specs are very impressive. It is the first Ferrari to feature five valves per cylinder (three intake and two exhaust valves) and its 3.5-litre V8 engine thumps out 380 stallions at 8250rpm. This translates to 109bhp per litre, an even higher specific output than the legendary McLaren F1’s 103bhp per litre. Performance? Little-league no longer, thanks to 0-60mph in 4.5sec and a top speed of 178mph. That’s properly fast, even today. The fabulous 90-degree V8 is complemented by ?one of the most sophisticated exhaust systems of the ?time, which has a wastegate that opens at high revs ?to reduce back-pressure and, unfettered, allow an extra 20bhp. How exuberant and typically Ferrari – yet it is balanced by a cool and efficient Bosch Motronic engine management system, a six-speed gearbox ?with tightly stacked ratios, underbody aerodynamics with twin diffusers at the rear, electronically adjustable dampers, and proper racing car-style double wishbones at each corner. The upshot is that Ferrari not only moved its F355 emphatically ahead of the 911 and Honda NSX opposition, it pushed the car straight into the jaws of the senior class dominated by the V12 Ferrari 512TR and the thunderous Lamborghini Diablo VT. Road ?tests of the time attested to the F355 being faster to 100mph than both, with the same time to the one kilometre post and a top speed almost identical to the 512’s. Bravissimo! Manke no mistake, the F355 ?is most certainly a supercar even if, today, a good, ?pre-owned example can be had for the relatively affordable (against a Dino) sum of £55,000 – prices that, having moved north over the last year or two, already prove that interest in the F355 is increasing. The best thing? Even at that money, it’s still an absolute bargain for what’s on offer. The Ferrari is a pure supercar but it is useable every day. And every time I drive it, I am reminded how special it is, even when sitting in traffic with the air conditioning on. You can drive the 355 fast and comfortably, revving it to about five thou, with the radio playing and the ?air-con cooling. But, as advised by owner Blow, things only really start to happen above that. So turn the tunes and chills off, drop two gears via the riflebolt gearshifter and hold on. The 355 gets serious. You want the driving seat mounted forward so you can grasp the fat power-assisted steering wheel, then reprogramme your brain to keep up with the speed with which the 355 lunges into the corners. The gears are worth swapping just for the crack and the powerful vented disc brakes slough off speed with disdain. The car crushes the distance between corners with complete authority, and then it takes those corners with insane levels of grip and speed. Simply point and squirt. The superb suspension does the rest as the 355 hunkers down and launches itself through the bends. The first run along the costal road is a blur. So do it again. Concentrate, balance the throttle, gearchanges and braking. Still too much infused information to process, so do it again. More at one with the 355, you delve more deeply into its performance abilities. The fat 225- and 275-section 40-profile tyres mounted on 18-inch rims are not even close to the limit on this road and the 355 could do with a long, closed racetrack ?to get anywhere near its properly exciting edge. Amazingly, the electronic damping control that varies the suspension’s stiffness confers an extremely comfortable ride amid all the high-speed action. The Dino is charming and so much better than I imagined it might be. The 355 is a true supercar, yet as capable of being a daily commuter as it is pushing the envelope of serious performance. The 355 was never a ‘little’ nor a ‘cheap’ Ferrari, being launched at £83,000, whereas the Dino was perceived as being the ‘small’ Ferrari when first seen in 1969. Sure, the 246GT commands a price three times that of a good 355, and that’s no surprise: but don’t be surprised either if the F355 starts edging closer to it. I will help Buyer arrange shipping. Sold AS IS.

Trim SPIDER CONVERTIBLE

Ferrari : 355 SPIDER FERRARI 355 SPYDER 15K 1995 MILES NEW VALVE GUIDES SHOW CONDITION NEW CLUTCH

$62,900.00

Los Angeles, California

Year -

Make -

Model -

Category -

Mileage -

Posted Over 1 Month

VIN NUMBER ZFFpr48a3s0102891 Up for sale is a Southern California Ferrari F355 Spider in spectacular condition with just over 15k miles! This car is a classic on the rise! (See Richard Hammond’s commentary below.) FRESH TIMING BELT SERVICES WILL BE INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE! This Ferrari 355 Spider features the classic Argento Silver exterior with a Nero black leather interior. This F355 Spider features a new clutch, new valve guides, new brake master cylinder. The valve guides were replaced at the engine out service with a documented history of receipts from prior owners and photographs of that major service and valve guide replacement. Also included is the folder of receipts going back many years documenting this car’s history. With the car comes the Ferrari tool kit and owners manual, as shown in the photograph, along with upgraded Pirelli tires with just 1k miles on the front tires and upgraded 295mm rear tires (same size as used on the 550 Maranello). The paint on this Ferrari is nothing short of stunning. People think it is a new car because the paint literally looks like a new car. The silver is so much classier than the typical “look at me” red Ferrari. The top is black and it took looks new. The top mechanism works as it should. You are buying not only a Ferrari but also piece of mind with this F355 as new valve guides were installed about 3,500 miles ago! One of the top Ferrari service centers in the U.S. (Tillack /FastCars) did a major service at 11,561 miles, but they also installed new valve guides at that same time and the photographed and documented their work. If you are familiar with the 355 then you know the only real issue to have surfaced with the engine in these cars is the premature wear of the valve guides. The bills for this peace of mind and the clutch and the brake master cylinder was over $12,000 so the next owner of this car doesn’t have that worry these details! (See Valve Guide Invoice summary below.) Tillack also fixed the notorious so called “sticky parts” as well. The Master cylinder replaced with new one at 10,988 miles due to minor fluid contamination. Tillack then installed a new clutch about 3.5k miles ago. The prior owner paid $80k for the car and that was before having the valve guides done and the new clutch installed, etc. (Purchase order included with the records for the Ferrari.) This Ferrari has been upgraded with a special Alpine alarm which locks and unlocks the doors as well as a high performance Alpine stereo. Two remotes are included. The 1995 year model was the best and fastest F355 as it featured the F40 style dual intake system. After 95 Ferrari went to single system for the F355 intake. But note, they went back to dual systems for all Ferraris after that (360, 430, 458) which proves the dual intake is superior! The only downside to the 1995 was the aforementioned notorious valve guides that potentially plagued all 355s. However, that issue is no longer an issue with this car. The 355 is the last of the traditional Ferraris. It traces its roots to the Enzo era Ferraris. Unlike the newer Ferrari spiders the 355 is a pure sports car. It is the last mid-engine Ferrari to feature mechanical linkage controlling its throttles. So when you press the gas pedal you are actually mechanically moving the throttle bodies whereas the new cars are all drive by wire, which is less direct feeling because in the new cars you are no longer connected to the drivetrain. It also has something the new Ferraris do not—five valves per cylinder and the sound of an F1 race car! That intimate sports car feeling is gone on the newer Ferrar but there on the 355. Likewise, you can't buy a manual shifting 458 Ferrari. Ferrari only makes the automatic flappy paddle now. If you want to experience the snick-snick of manual shifting and heel and toe driving while actually being at one with the sports car and an 8500 RPM redline then the F355 Spider is the last traditional Ferrari. It also sounds better than any V8 Ferrari ever made. The 355 is more compact and manageable than later generation Ferraris, sharper looking and drives like a Ferrari race car with the direct feel of a go kart. The F355 are starting to creep up in value now as the market realizes the value of a sexy high performance Ferrari (even today she's faster than most sports cars with a mid 4 second zero to sixty). The miles and condition of this Ferrari make her a worthy addition to any collection. Hammond drives the icons: The Ferrari 355The car that saved Ferrari is all set to be a future classic, says Richard All the legend, the myth, the history and mystery in the world cannot distract from one single fact when it comes to Ferraris: they have to be pretty. Stat sheets can go on about power-to-weight ratios, structural stiffness, torsional rigidity and exotic materials all day long, but if the car looks like a moose, then it's a moose - an offence made all the worse if it's supposed to be a prancing horse. The 348 that preceded the 355 was not an especially ugly car, but it also wasn't especially pretty. The slats down the side echoed the Testarossa - not a good thing - so it looked dated even when it was brand new. And it certainly wasn't a hit, performance-wise. In fact, much was made of the news that Honda launched the NSX at the same time, and it appeared to be, in every single way, better than the Ferrari. The 355 was Ferrari's answer. Beauty and power came together and are still very much in evidence today. I'm not one for getting all gooey about Ferraris in general, but there is undeniably something that happens deep inside when you see that yellow badge on a V8 or a steering-wheel boss. Ferrari: the name carries so much weight, even to those who, like me, have never had - nor wanted - a hat with the brand on it. And, my God, the 355 is pretty. It shared almost every dimension with the 348, but the body was all-new and its sculpting had involved a rumoured 1,800 hours of wind-tunnel testing. But there's little sense of form following function here; it's too pretty for that. If anything, the 355 has somehow got more attractive in the 19 years since it arrived. Inside, I get a reminder that all Ferraris go through a phase when they are not classic - they're just old Fezzers. I'd say that the 355 is coming through that and entering the classic stage of its life. In true Ferrari form, the interior has dated well, but perhaps not aged so well. Scruffy leather and the patina of age works well in a classic luxury car - an old Bentley, say, or a Jag - but less so in a Ferrari. But the layout, the design and the feel of it all scream of their own time and, while not fooling anyone that they were drawn yesterday, still have something to say about their period in car design... almost the definition of a classic, in fact. The mid-mounted 380bhp V8 revs to 8,250rpm and sounds satisfyingly guttural and raucous when it does so. It's a Ferrari, so while it has to be pretty, it can't afford to be slow either. And it's quick, it really is. The headlines, 0-62mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183mph, are both perfectly acceptable, thank you. The way it delivers those is what it's all about. The bark and fizz of the V8, the click-clack through that iconic, shiny H-gate - it's all there. It's a Ferrari and feels it. The engine and suspension all received major updates to produce the 355, and the gearbox too, with a six-speed manual operated, of course, through that sculptural gear selector. It feels all those things a Ferrari needs to feel; it's a taut thoroughbred, and you get the sense too that, once you've overcome the inevitable nerves that can flutter at any encounter with any Ferrari, the thing is biddable and usable, with perhaps just a touch of fragility to keep things special. There's a huge amount of love for the F355, with some claiming it pretty much saved the company from the doldrums in the early Nineties, others that it was the car that finally shifted the old-fashioned and faintly stuffy conviction amongst the Ferraristi that the only ‘proper' Ferraris were the V12s. Some, including F1 champion Phil Hill, named it as one of the 10 best Ferraris ever. A landmark car, then, in the story of a legendary carmaker. Not bad for around £55k now. Can the F355 take over the mantle of the Dino as the junior Ferrari of choice? Time for a shoot-out in the South African sunshine It used to be that a gentleman driver would only consider a Ferrari with a large and powerful V12 engine mounted up front. Porsche manufactured small, rear-engined sporting cars for the arriviste. ?All that changed when Ferrari launched the Dino, with a mid-mounted V6, and followed it with a succession ?of V8-engined sports cars. Ever since, Ferrari has offered two tiers of performance and style – but the Dino has moved out of the new-money realm into ?the collector-car stratosphere. Could the 1990s F355 be about to follow suit? Ferrari broke from its traditional front-engine philosophy in 1968, when the diminutive Dino appeared. The new model was not even badged a Ferrari; it was simply a Dino 206GT. To make matters worse it was developed along with Fiat, the V6 finding its way under the bonnet of the Fiat Dino Coupé and Spider. Motoring aristocrats such as the Agnellis of this world were about to be joined by successful Luigis who owned lucrative pasta joints. What was Enzo thinking? The Dino became an instant hit with the new Ferrari customers and it was a brilliant piece of automotive design and engineering. It also moved Ferrari up a number of gears, transforming it from a small manufacturer of racing cars and expensive road cars into a specialist manufacturer of racing cars, expensive exotics and more affordable sports cars. In 1969 Fiat took commercial control of Ferrari, allowing Enzo to concentrate on his first love – motor racing – while considerably expanding the company and allowing it to grow into the success it is today. The sublimely beautiful Dino Berlinetta and Spider were followed by the less classical, more angular Bertone-styled Dino 308GT4 in 1974. It was never considered to be one of Ferrari’s finest creations, yet its V8-engined heart founded a theme for every ?junior Ferrari that followed, starting in 1975 with the superb 308 (as featured in Octane issue 83), which morphed into the 328, then the tricky and nervous ?348 of 1989. This was the low point for the junior mid-engined Ferraris, as the company appeared to be concentrating its skills on the larger Testarossa and 512TR, the magnificent 288GTO and the ballistic F40. But in 1994 Ferrari focused anew and came up with the F355. The best mid-engined, smaller-displacement Ferrari since the original Dino, the F355 was met with enthusiasm by both the press and Ferrari owners, who once again had a compact and wieldy sports car to enjoy thrashing along their favourite roads. Both designed by Pininfarina, these are two of the best-looking Ferraris ever created. The F355 has obviously moved on from the 246 and its specs are very impressive. It is the first Ferrari to feature five valves per cylinder (three intake and two exhaust valves) and its 3.5-litre V8 engine thumps out 380 stallions at 8250rpm. This translates to 109bhp per litre, an even higher specific output than the legendary McLaren F1’s 103bhp per litre. Performance? Little-league no longer, thanks to 0-60mph in 4.5sec and a top speed of 178mph. That’s properly fast, even today. The fabulous 90-degree V8 is complemented by ?one of the most sophisticated exhaust systems of the ?time, which has a wastegate that opens at high revs ?to reduce back-pressure and, unfettered, allow an extra 20bhp. How exuberant and typically Ferrari – yet it is balanced by a cool and efficient Bosch Motronic engine management system, a six-speed gearbox ?with tightly stacked ratios, underbody aerodynamics with twin diffusers at the rear, electronically adjustable dampers, and proper racing car-style double wishbones at each corner. The upshot is that Ferrari not only moved its F355 emphatically ahead of the 911 and Honda NSX opposition, it pushed the car straight into the jaws of the senior class dominated by the V12 Ferrari 512TR and the thunderous Lamborghini Diablo VT. Road ?tests of the time attested to the F355 being faster to 100mph than both, with the same time to the one kilometre post and a top speed almost identical to the 512’s. Bravissimo! Manke no mistake, the F355 ?is most certainly a supercar even if, today, a good, ?pre-owned example can be had for the relatively affordable (against a Dino) sum of £40,000-45,000 – prices that, having moved north over the last year or two, already prove that interest in the F355 is increasing. The best thing? Even at that money, it’s still an absolute bargain for what’s on offer.The Ferrari is a pure supercar but it is useable every day. And every time I drive it, I am reminded how special it is, even when sitting in traffic with the air conditioning on.You can drive the 355 fast and comfortably, revving it to about five thou, with the radio playing and the ?air-con cooling. But, as advised by owner Blow, things only really start to happen above that. So turn the tunes and chills off, drop two gears via the riflebolt gearshifter and hold on. The 355 gets serious.You want the driving seat mounted forward so you can grasp the fat power-assisted steering wheel, then reprogramme your brain to keep up with the speed with which the 355 lunges into the corners. The gears are worth swapping just for the crack and the powerful vented disc brakes slough off speed with disdain. The car crushes the distance between corners with complete authority, and then it takes those corners with insane levels of grip and speed. Simply point and squirt. The superb suspension does the rest as the 355 hunkers down and launches itself through the bends. The first run along the costal road is a blur. So do it again. Concentrate, balance the throttle, gearchanges and braking. Still too much infused information to process, so do it again. More at one with the 355, you delve more deeply into its performance abilities. The fat 225- and 275-section 40-profile tyres mounted on 18-inch rims are not even close to the limit on this road and the 355 could do with a long, closed racetrack ?to get anywhere near its properly exciting edge. Amazingly, the electronic damping control that varies the suspension’s stiffness confers an extremely comfortable ride amid all the high-speed action. The Dino is charming and so much better than I imagined it might be. The 355 is a true supercar, yet as capable of being a daily commuter as it is pushing the envelope of serious performance. The 355 was never a ‘little’ nor a ‘cheap’ Ferrari, being launched at £83,000, whereas the Dino was perceived as being the ‘small’ Ferrari when first seen in 1969.Sure, the 246GT commands a price three times that of a good 355, and that’s no surprise: but don’t be surprised either if the F355 starts edging closer to it. Subject: Tillack & Co., Ltd. Auto Repair Invoice No. 200612014> Tillack & Co., Ltd.> BAR #: AK105357> 630 Mary Ann Drive> Redondo Beach, Ca 90278> Phone: 310-318-8760 FAX: 310-376-3392> >> > Make: 95 FERRARI F355 SPIDER SIL/B> Mileage: 11,565 > LAGUNA NIGEL, CA 92677 VIN: 102891 06/95> > __________________________________________________________________> > 1) 30K SERVICE $5500> 2) COMPRESSION AND LEAK DOWN, INC IN SERVICE> 3) STICKY AREAS, CENTER CONSOLE, DOOR HANDLES AND TRIANGLE AREAS $400> 4) IF NEEDED VALVE GUIDES $2500> 5) CHECK GAS GUAGE> 6) ADJUST PARKING BRAKE, INC IN SERVICE> 7) TAKE PICTURES AND E-MAIL> > __________________________________________________________________> Job01 PARTS Labor: $0.00> __________________________________________________________________> DEC.18- REC'D MAJOR SERVICE KIT. PO#1789> DEC.19- REC'D PARTS: GASKETS & SEALS. PO#1792> JAN.11- REC'D RINGS PO#1872> JAN.12- REC'D O RING PO #1884> JAN.15- REC'D PARTS PO#1897> JAN.16- REC'D C.V. JOINT PO#1900> __________________________________________________________________> FPN00150311 GASKET,HEAD F355 2.0 @ 165.00 =$ 330.00> FPN00152055 GASKET,INL MANIFOLD 35 8.0 @ 2.45 =$ 19.60> FPN99100220 CAMSEAL,KIT ALL F355 1.0 @ 135.00 =$ 135.00> FPN99100122 GASKET, CAM COVER KIT 1.0 @ 105.00 =$ 105.00> FPN00151562 FILTER,UFI 355 AIR 2.0 @ 45.00 =$ 90.00> FPN00199830 BELT,355 ALTERNATOR A/ 1.0 @ 28.45 =$ 28.45> FPN00150867 RING,O PHASE SENSOR 2.0 @ 4.25 =$ 8.50> FPN00154984 GASKET,EXHAUST RING 2.0 @ 17.99 =$ 35.98> FPN0184986D BELT, CAM 355-360 2.0 @ 95.00 =$ 190.00> FPN0011779 FILTER, FUEL 308 81&UP 1.0 @ 28.00 =$ 28.00> FPN00197654 FILTER,360 OIL LS925 1.0 @ 42.50 =$ 42.50> FPN00199832 BELT,POWER STERRING 1.0 @ 25.59 =$ 25.59> FPN00161609 HOSE,PIPE-EXP TANK 355 1.0 @ 14.59 =$ 14.59> FPN64328400 HOSE,16x23x390 1.0 @ 48.12 =$ 48.12> FPN00171631 HOSE,36x80 355 4.0 @ 24.50 =$ 98.00> 98HP43 OIL,MOBIL 1 EXT 15W50 10.0 @ 7.99 =$ 79.90> ZX001 COOLANT,ZEREX 2.0 @ 12.33 =$ 24.66> 504G FLUID,CASTROL LMA BRAK 1.0 @ 8.49 =$ 8.49> 53259 80/140 OIL,REDLINE 80/140 GO 1.0 @ 15.94 =$ 15.94> FPN00154984 GASKET,EXHAUST RING 2.0 @ 17.99 =$ 35.98> FPN00101044 RING, O 1.0 @ 2.59 =$ 2.59> FPN00147278 O-RING, COOLANT HOSE 6.0 @ 2.70 =$ 16.20> FPN00144487 RING,SEALING 27x35 2.0 @ 29.50 =$ 59.00> FPN00145191 GASKET,OIL TANK 1.0 @ 32.40 =$ 32.40> FPN00137579 GASKET,OIL FILTER HSNG 1.0 @ 4.10 =$ 4.10> FPN00159914 GASKET,EXHAUST DONUT 2.0 @ 39.07 =$ 78.14> FPN00151064 GASKET,EXHAUST HEADER 8.0 @ 16.45 =$ 131.60> FPN00141332 GASKET,H20 MFLD 12 REQ 8.0 @ 2.75 =$ 22.00> FPN00152362 GASKET,WATER MANIFOLD 2.0 @ 3.24 =$ 6.48> FPN00105192 SEAL,THERMOSTAT 1.0 @ 10.08 =$ 10.08> 88-10102 GREASE, CV GKN 0.3 @ 56.55 =$ 16.97> 2417 CLEANER,BRAKE 4.0 @ 4.49 =$ 17.96> 513705 PRIMER,KRYLON GREY SPR 1.0 @ 6.10 =$ 6.10> FPN00136140 RING,O 1.0 @ 4.10 =$ 4.10> FPN00107787 BEARING 1.0 @ 115.00 =$ 115.00> FPN00133939 RING,O D 1.0 @ 4.91 =$ 4.91> FPN00153921 GASKET, F355 1.0 @ 36.21 =$ 36.21> FPN00133628 SEALING RING,F355 1.0 @ 56.50 =$ 56.50> FPN00147278 O-RING, COOLANT HOSE 6.0 @ 2.99 =$ 17.94> FPN70000867 CV JOINT, GEAR BOX SID 2.0 @ 75.00 =$ 150.00> 3M2034 SANDPAPER, 1000GR 9X11 1.0 @ 1.70 =$ 1.70> 513705 PRIMER,KRYLON GREY SPR 1.0 @ 6.10 =$ 6.10> PMR7A PLUG,NGK LASER PLAT SP 8.0 @ 14.75 =$ 118.00> __________________________________________________________________> Job02 SHIPPING Labor: $0.00> __________________________________________________________________> DEC.18- REC'D SHIPMENT FOR SERVICE PARTS PO#1789> DEC.19- REC'D SHIPMENT FOR CV JOINTS AND BEEARING PO#1792> > __________________________________________________________________> SHIPPING FREIGHT CHARGE 1.0 @ 45.00 =$ 45.00> SHIPPING FREIGHT CHARGE 1.0 @ 15.00 =$ 15.00> __________________________________________________________________> Job03 DECEMBER 12- TECH #125 Labor: N/C> __________________________________________________________________> PERFORM LEAK DOWN TEST> > > CYL 1: 4% CYL 5: 18%> CYL 2: 5% CYL 6: 5%> CYL 3: 8% CYL 7: 4%> CYL 4: 4% CYL 8: 16%> > > > > > __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job04 DECEMBER 12- TECH #161 Labor: $23.75> __________________________________________________________________> HELP TECH W/ LEAK DOWN.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job05s 4910 TRANSPORT LOCAL Sublet: $0.00> __________________________________________________________________> ROUNDTRIP TOW FROM LAGUNA NIGEL TO SHOP> __________________________________________________________________> Job06 DECEMBER 15- TECH #161 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVE INSIDE DOOR RELASE HANDLES. REMOVE COUNTER CONSOLE PLASTIC> PIECES. LABEL ALL CONNECTIONS. BEGIN TO STRIP.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job07 DECEMBER TECH #137 Labor: N/C> __________________________________________________________________> DEC.18- ( ORDERED MAJOR SERVICE PARTS. CALLED VENDOR RE:> BLOCK HEADS.> DEC.19- RESEARCH & ORDER OF GASKETS FOR HEAD JOB.> JAN.2- CALLS TO BLOCK SERVICE FOR CYLINDER HEADS.> JAN.4- CALL BLOCK SERVICE VENDOR.> JAN.8- CALL BLOCK SERVICE & SEND TECH TO VENDOR.> JAN.22- (0.25)= CALL A/C VENDOR FOR RECHARGE.> > > __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job08 DECEMBER 18- TECH #125 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> PUT CAR ON RACK & REMOVED EXHAUST SYSTEM & BUMPER & WHEELS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job09 DECEMBER 19- TECH #125 Labor: $380.00> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVED MOTOR FROM CAR.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job10 DECEMBER 19- TECH #161 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> HELP TECH DROP MOTOR ONTO CART. STRIP & PAINT PARTS.> DISASSEMBLE SWITCHES & STRIP IN SOLVENT.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job11 DECEMBER 20- TECH #125 Labor: $237.50> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVED INTAKE PLENUM & EXHAUST MANIFOLD & CATS. REMOVED WATER PUMP W/> POWER STEERING PUMP W/ POWER STEERING PUMP.> REMOVED COOLANT MANIFOLD. REMOVED VALVE COVERS & 3 OF THE 4 CAMS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job12 DECEMBER 20- TECH #161 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> STRIP & PAINT INTERIOR PARTS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job13 DECEMBER 21- TECH #125 Labor: $237.50> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVED FOURTH CAM. REMOVED HEADS. CLEAN MATING SURFACES.> REMOVED CRANK PULLEY. CLEANED PISTONS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job14 DECEMBER 22- TECH #125 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> CLEANED BLOCK & GEAR BOX. REMOVED A/C PUMP & BRACKETS.> CRANK DRIVE GEAR.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job15 DECEMBER 22- TECH #161 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> CONT'D TO SAND PRIME PAINT. ASSEMBLE SWITCHES.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job16 DECEMBER 28- TECH #161 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> CONT'D TO SAND, PAINT & REINSTALL INTERIOR PIECES INTO CAR.> RECONNECT ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job17 DECEMBER TECH #108 Labor: $60.00> __________________________________________________________________> DEC.22- WENT TO VENDORS TO DROP OFF CYLINDER HEADS.> JAN.17- CLEAN ENGINE COMPARTMENT.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job18s 4820 GENERAL REPAIR Sublet: $1,800.00> __________________________________________________________________> CYLINDER HEADS, REMOVE OLD VALVE GUIDES AND INSTALL NEW STYLE VALVEGUIDES, REMOVE CHECK AND CLEAN ALL INTAKE AND EXHAUST VALVES, CLEAN AND PAINT CYLINDER HEADS AND RE ASSEMBLE> __________________________________________________________________> Job19 JANUARY 10- TECH #125 Labor: $380.00> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVED OIL PAN & CROSS MEMBER. REMOVED CRANK GEARS & COVER. PRESSED> OUT GEARS. THEN CLEANED MATING SURFACES.> INSTALLED HEADS THEN TORQUE.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job20 JANUARY 11- TECH #161 Labor: $47.50> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVE UPPER & LOWER STEERING COLUMN COVER. STRIP OFF STICKY FILM IN> SOLVENT TANK.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job21 JANUARY 11- TECH #125 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> REPLACED O RINGS ON OIL PIPES. CLEANED MATING SURFACE OF COOLANT> MANIFOLD.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job22 JANUARY 12- TECH #161 Labor: $47.50> __________________________________________________________________> SAND, PRIME & PAINT THE STEERING COLUMN COVER. LOWER & UPPER.> RE-INSTALL.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job23 JANUARY 12- TECH #125 Labor: $380.00> __________________________________________________________________> INSTALLED COOLANT MANIFOLDS & CONNECTION PIPE THAT RUNS TO THE HEAT> EXCHANGE. INSTALLED WATER PUMP ASSEMBLY & CONNECTED TO HEAT EXCHANGE.> REPLACED BELT & HOSES.> INSTALLED INTAKE MANIFOLDS & VACUUM HOSES. WORK ON CAM DRIVE SEAL.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job24 JANUARY 15- TECH #125 Labor: $285.00> __________________________________________________________________> REMOVED HALF SHAFTS & TOOK APART 1 CV JOINT. CLEANED & INSPECTED> BEARINGS. REPLACED BEARINGS & SEALS IN FRONT ENGINE COVER. CLEANED &> INSTALLED OIL PAN. REPLACED WASHER ON OIL BANJO FITTING ON MOTOR.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job25 JANUARY 16- TECH #125 Labor: $285.00> __________________________________________________________________> TORQUED NUTS ON CRANK & RIMS GEARS. PUT ON NEW SEALS IN CAM SEAL> CARRIERS. PUT CONNECTOR ON TO INJECTORS & TEMP SENSORS. FIGURED OUT &> INSTALLED CRANK PULLEY SENSORS.> INSTALLED CAMS & TORQUED.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job26 JANUARY 17- TECH #125 Labor: $190.00> __________________________________________________________________> TIMED CAM SHAFTS. INSTALLED GASKETS & CAM COVERS & END PLATES. TORQUED> CAMS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job27 JANUARY 18- TECH #125 Labor: $285.00> __________________________________________________________________> WORKED ON CV JOINTS. REPLACED BOOTS. INSTALLED CV JOINTS & COVERS.> INSTALLED HEADERS & CATS. INSTALLED NEW WATER LINES ON RESERVOIR &> HOOKED UP. INSTALLED WATER HOSES ON THERMOSTAT, PUT MOTOR IN CAR &> INSTALLED SUB FRAME.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job28s 4820 GENERAL REPAIR Sublet: $245.00> __________________________________________________________________> RECHARGE A/C SYSTEM. FILL W/ FREON.> __________________________________________________________________> Job29 JANUARY 19- TECH #161 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> HELP TECH INSTALL MOTOR & CONNECT MISC. CONNECTION INSTALL SPARK> PLUGS.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job30 JANUARY 19- TECH #125 Labor: $285.00> __________________________________________________________________> FINISH INSTALLING MOTOR & RAN CAR.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job31 JANUARY 20- TECH #125 Labor: $95.00> __________________________________________________________________> INSTALLED PLUG WIRES & COVERS W/ GASKETS/ INSTALLED BUMPER.> INSTALLED IN REAR FENDERS. TOPPED OFF OIL. RAN CAR.> __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job32 JANUARY 22- TECH #125 Labor: $380.00> __________________________________________________________________> PUT ON UNDER TRAYS. BLEED BRAKES & CLUTCH. HELPED TECH W/ SWITCHES.> THEN DIAGNOSE. ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS & FIXED TEST DROVE CAR. DID> CYLINDER LEAKAGE TEST ON THE 2 PREVIOUSLY BAD CYLINDERS. RESULTS ARE> 2% . REPAIR GAS GUAGE> > > __________________________________________________________________> __________________________________________________________________> Job33s 4815 DETAILING Sublet: $0.00> __________________________________________________________________> PERFORM COMPLIMENTARY DETAIL, CLEAN ENGINE BAY> > __________________________________________________________________> Payments to Tillack & Co., Ltd. Cost Summary> __________________________________________________________________> Labor 4,453.75> Parts 2,278.37> Non Taxable 60.00> Sublet 2,045.00> Haz Waste 0.25> Tax 187.97> Total $9,025.34> Payments 0.00> Bal Due 9,025.34> Status: Completed Work Order> > > Payments:> > > > > Thank you for choosing Tillack & Co., Ltd.>